爱上海 Tag Archive

spzgbwxxj

TUC calls for checks on RSI

first_img Comments are closed. For every person who wins compensation for repetitive strain injury thereare another 50 who are suffering in silence, the TUC has estimated. The unions body has calculated that more than 150,000 people suffer from RSIeach year, but just 3,000 won compensation last year. It has called on businesses to work more closely with unions to developprevention programmes, plan rehabilitation and agree compensation whereappropriate. Workers most at risk from RSI are those on small assembly lines or thoseusing keyboards or a mouse. A third of all workers – around 8 million – said their work conditionsrequire them to repeat the same sequence of movements “all the time”or “nearly all the time”. www.tuc.org.uk Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. TUC calls for checks on RSIOn 1 Sep 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

Read More

spzgbwxxj

Combing out a tangled problem

first_img New technique tracks brain function 60 times faster than traditional fMRI Related Devices used in mice offer a more accurate way to study the brain, potential treatment for disease, damage, mental illness Seeing brain activity in ‘almost real time’center_img Sensors go undercover to outsmart the brain Machines are getting cozy with our cells. Embeddable sensors record how and when neurons fire; electrodes spark heart cells to beat or brain cells to fire; neuron-like devices could even encourage faster regrowth after implantation in the brain.Soon, so-called brain-machine interfaces could do even more: monitor and treat symptoms of neurological disorders like Parkinson’s disease, provide a blueprint to design artificial intelligence, or even enable brain-to-brain communication.To achieve all of this and more, devices need a way to literally dive deeper into our cells to perform reconnaissance. The more we know about how neurons work, the more we can emulate, replicate, and treat them with our machines.Now, in a paper published in Nature Nanotechnology, Charles M. Lieber, the Joshua and Beth Friedman University Professor, presents an update to his original nanoscale devices for intracellular recording, the first nanotechnology developed to record electrical chatter inside a live cell. Nine years later, Lieber and his team have designed a way to make thousands of these devices at once, creating a nanoscale army that could speed efforts to find out what’s happening inside our cells.Prior to Lieber’s work, similar devices faced a Goldilocks conundrum: Too big, and they would record internal signals but kill the cell. Too small, and they failed to cross the cell’s membrane — recordings ended up noisy and imprecise.Lieber’s new nanowires were just right. Designed in 2010, the originals had a nanoscale V-shaped tip with a transistor at the bottom of the V. This design could pierce cell membranes and send accurate data back without destroying the cell.But there was a problem. Siliconnanowires are far longer than they are wide, making them wobbly and hard to wrangle. “They’re as flexible as cooked noodles,” said Anqi Zhang, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Chemistry in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Lieber Lab. Zhang is a co-author on the team’s latest work.To create the original devices, lab members had to ensnare one nanowire noodle at a time, find each arm of the V, and then weave the wires into the recording device. Two devices took two to three weeks to make.“It was very tedious work,” said Zhang.But nanowires are not made one at a time; they’re made en masse like the thing they resemble: cooked spaghetti. Using the nanocluster catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid method, with which Lieber created the first nanowires, the team built an environment where the wires could germinate on their own. They can pre-determine each wire’s diameter and length but not how the wires are positioned once ready. Even though they grow thousands or even millions of nanowires at a time, the end result is a tangled mess.A U-shaped nanowire pierces the membrane of a neuron. Courtesy of The Lieber Research GroupThe solution? Lieber and his team designed a trap for their loose cooked noodles: They made U-shaped trenches on a silicon wafer and then combed the nanowires across the surface. The combing process untangles the mess and deposits each nanowire into a neat, U-shaped hole. Then, each U curve gets a tiny transistor, similar to the bottom of their V-shaped devices.With the combing method, Lieber and his team can complete hundreds of nanowire devices in the same amount of time they used to make just a couple. “Because they’re very well-aligned, they’re very easy to control,” Zhang said.So far, Zhang and her colleagues have used the U-shaped nanoscale devices to record intracellular signals in both neural and cardiac cells in cultures. Coated with a substance that mimics the feel of a cell membrane, the nanowires can cross this barrier with minimal effort or damage to the cell. And they can record intracellular chatter with the same level of precision as their biggest competitor: patch clamp electrodes.Patch clamp electrodes are about 100 times bigger than nanowires. As the name suggests, the tool clamps down on a cell’s membrane, causing irreversible damage. The patch clamp electrode can capture stable recording of the electrical signals inside the cells. But, Zhang says, “after recording, the cell dies.”The Lieber team’s U-shaped nanoscale devices are friendlier to their cell hosts. “They can be inserted into multiple cells in parallel without causing damage,” Zhang said.Right now, the devices are so gentle that the cell membrane nudges them out after about 10 minutes of recording. To extend this window with their next design, the team is considering adding a bit of biochemical glue to the tip or roughing up the edges so the wire catches against the membrane.The nanoscale devices have another advantage over the patch clamp: They can record more cells in parallel. With the clamps, researchers can collect just a few cell recordings at a time. For this study, Zhang recorded up to 10 cells at once. “Potentially, that can be much greater,” she says. The more cells they can record at a time, the more they can see how networks of cells interact with each other as they do in living creatures.In the process of scaling their nanowire design, the team also confirmed a long-standing theory called the curvature hypothesis. After Lieber invented the first nanowires, researchers speculated that the width of a nanowire’s tip (the bottom of the V or U) can affect a cell’s response to the wire. For this study, the team experimented with multiple U curves and transistor sizes. The results confirmed the original hypothesis: Cells like a narrow tip and a small transistor.“The beauty of science to many, ourselves included, is having such challenges to drive hypotheses and future work,” Lieber said. With the scalability challenge behind them, the team hopes to capture even more precise recordings, perhaps within subcellular structures, and record cells in living creatures.But for Lieber, one brain-machine challenge is more enticing than all others: “bringing cyborgs to reality.”last_img read more

Read More

kpkgicjmk

Binghamton bowling alley owner says reopening is a ‘new beginning’

first_img“We continued to send letters to the governor and local legislative branches and lobbyists, we worked and pushed,” she said. While Ripic says her facility was never in danger of closing for financial reasons, she couldn’t be happier to welcome back her bowling family, and anyone who wants to come for a game or two. “We were on the verge of being shut down for as many months as we had been in operation,” she said. “Last night when we left after cleaning we said ‘I wonder when our last sale was last year?’ It’s almost to the day August 22 was our first sale. Today is the 17th, it’s like a brand new beginning for us.” Now the time has come to prove that bowling can be done safely. The facility has been fitted with new air filters and hand sanitizing stations. Bowlers can only use every other lane in order to maintain social distancing. 6 people can use a single lane, and no more than 8 people can use 2 lanes right next to each other. At Ripic’s Carousel lanes in Binghamton, owner Beckie Ripic says the news Friday brought with it relief after more than five months of being shut down. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — Today was the big day for bowlers and bowling alley owners across New York State. Governor Andrew Cuomo announced Friday that bowling centers could reopen starting Monday morning. Ripic says the road to reopening has been a long one. The news comes one week after Ripic joined local leaders and bowling alley owners in Waverly to rally the state to reopen, now it’s back to business. center_img The closure due to the virus came just months after Ripic and her husband purchased the old Laurel Bowl on Laurel Ave and reopened under the new name. “Come on down, we have s lot of air hugs, we’ve missed everybody in the last five months, we just want people to get back out on the lanes.” As a member of the Board of the Bowling Proprietors Association of America, Ripic played a role in swaying the state to give bowling alleys a chance. “We had a crew in here this weekend doing all sorts of cleaning to get ready for it and it’s just so good to hear the noise of the pins crashing behind us,” she said. “It was very overwhelming when we got the news on Friday I bawled like a baby,” she said. last_img read more

Read More

hgdqhzffz

F-M indoor track stars earn medals at state championship meet

first_img Tags: CBAF-Mindoor trackJ-D When the Fayetteville-Manlius indoor track and field teams traveled to Staten Island for last Saturday’s New York State Public High School Athletic Association championships, the intention was to bring home plenty of medals.And that’s what the Hornets did, not just in its usual places like distance runs, but also in events like the girls high jump, where Harper Stoppacher recorded a third-place finish.Having cleared 5 feet 4 inches during the season, Stoppacher matched that effort, which ultimately got her on the medal podium just ahead of Liverpool’s Amina Sinclair, who was seventh with 5’3” as Half Hollow Hills East’s Soledad Jean won by topping 5’8”. Walters also finished fourth in the girls 3,000-meter run in 9:45.08, while Phoebe White, who was 17th in the 1,000-meter run, paired with Grace Kaercher, Fiona Mejico and Adrianna Caron to finish seventh in the 4×400 relay in 4:07.91 after qualifying for the finals with a season-best 4:02.50.Dan Sokolovic threw the shot put 46’4 1/2” and took 19th place, while Ian Brown, Corey Gallagher, Ben Hutz and Owen Snyder finished 18th in the 4×400 relay in 3:34.13.Jamesville-DeWitt had Joe Staples take part in the boys 55-meter dash, his time of 6.76 seconds not enough to reach the finals, where South Shore’s Brandon Smith tore to victory in 6.27 secondsMeanwhile, Christian Brothers Academy’s Joel Gaffney took part in the 600-meter run, looking to improve upon 1:25.03 – which he did, getting 11th place overall in 1:23.29 as Springfield Gardens’ Reheem Hayles won in 1:18.48.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story center_img There was also a runner-up finish for the girls Hornets in the 4×800 relay, where Claire Walters, Grace Kaercher, Hannah Kaercher and Maddy Duggleby went nine minutes, 12.81 seconds, beating everyone except Shenendehowa, who took the state title in 9:05.27.In the boys 3,200-meter run, F-M’s Peyton Geehrer nearly made it to the top. With his time of 9:16.02, Geehrer improved by more than five seconds over his previous-best 9:21.63 and was only topped by the 9:13.20 from Warwick Valley’s Behailu Bekele-Arcuri.Joining Geehrer in the 3,200, Sam Otis made his way to seventh place in 9:24.13, while Geoff Howles claimed eighth place in 9:25.01, less than a second behind Otis.last_img read more

Read More

fofabvlic

Denmark’s first public monument to a black woman is Caribbean-made

first_imgJeannette Ehlers and La Vaughn Belle A Caribbean-born artist has made history in Denmark by collaborating to create the country’s first public monument to a black woman. Tobago-born, St. Croix-based artist, La Vaughn Belle, collaborated with Copenhagen-based Jeannette Ehlers, to create “I Am Queen Mary,” a statue unveiled in Copenhagen on March 31st.Tribute to freedom fighterThe memorial is a tribute to Mary Thomas, a 19th-century freedom fighter, who led a major uprising on St. Croix, one of the Virgin Islands that was then part of the Danish West Indies. The unveiling marked 101 years since Transfer Day, when Denmark sold St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John to the United States for $25 million. The statue is painted entirely black and rises nearly 23 feet on a hefty pedestal. Thomas is shown seated in a position of power and government. Fireburn labor revoltThomas was an important leader of the ‘Fireburn’ labor revolt on St. Croix. The Fireburn began on October 1, 1878 as an uprising against the contractual servitude that continued to bind workers to the plantation system after the 1848 abolition of slavery in the former Danish West Indies.The insurrection was for better working and living conditions and involved burning down most of Frederiksted town as well as sugar cane fields on a great number of St. Croix’s plantations. Along with Mary Thomas, the three women – Axeline ‘Agnes’ Elizabeth Salomon, Matilde McBean and Susanna ‘Bottom Belly’ Abrahamsson – led the largest labor revolt in Danish colonial history. They were arrested and sent to Denmark in 1882 to serve prison sentences in Christianshavn’s Women’s Prison. Their sentences were later commuted, and they were returned to St. Croix and venerated in U.S. Virgin Islands cultural mythology as the Queens of the Fireburn. There are folksongs dedicated to ‘Queen Mary’ and a highway named in her honor. The European country never fully acknowledged its colonialist past in the Caribbean; although the Danish government recognizes Denmark’s wrongful role in the slave trade, it has never formally apologized for it.Also has Bajan rootsThe statue’s creator, Belle, whose roots also extend to Barbados, also teaches at the University of the Virgin Islands. She own a few businesses – a Latin dance studio, House of Clave, and a guesthouse, Trumpetbush Manor – with her husband, Rivert Diaz. She moved to St. Croix at age 7. Her work borrows from elements of architecture, literature, history, archeology and social protest to create narratives that challenge the colonial process. She is best known for her work reinterpreting the material artifacts of colonialism and uses her work to create a form of alternative archive that challenges the colonial narrative. For more on her work see www.lavaughnbelle.comlast_img read more

Read More

ucststker

LVR Bombers run table at South Okanagan Fieldhockey Tournament

first_imgKeeper Rylee Zondervan registered three shutouts to lead the L.V. Rogers Bombers to an impressive 4-0 record at the South Okanagan Hornets Fieldhockey tournament Saturday in Oliver.In the process, the Bombers posted wins over G.W. Graham of Chilliwack, South Kamloops, Kelowna’s Mt. Boucherie and Agassiz Eagles.“Amazing tireless work by every player on the team,” said Bomber coach Bruce Walgren.“I was really proud to watch the team step and play so well, especially the rookies who have never played before and held their own.”Walgren held high praise for rookies Lakpa Dietz, Lisa Demski, Katharina Hayn and Kassandra Schloeder, who all played extremely well and came close on multiple occasions to scoring their first goals.  After losing eight players to graduation, the Bombers took a squad of 13 players to the South Okanagan.LVR started the tournament slowly against G.W. Graham, but once the players got their game legs, the Bombers took over the contest.Noa Butterfield and Emma Borhi scored for LVR in a 2-0 win.LVR then edged South Kamloops 1-0 on a goal by Hanna Quinn.Saturday, LVR got the offence going to down Mt. Boucherie 3-1.Allie Zondervan, Naomi Perkins, with a pair, scored for the Bombers.The Bombers then defeated Agassiz 3-0 on pair of goals by Quinn and a single by Borhi.The Bombers return to the pitch Thursday at Pass Creek in Castlegar when LVR meets Stanley Humphries Rockers at 4 p.m.last_img read more

Read More

lkelyodzf

Mallard’s Team of the Week — Nelson Neptunes Swim Team

first_imgMallard’s Source for sports is very impressed with the Neptunes overcoming adversity and wants to praise the swimmers with Team of the Week.For more information regarding the Neptunes program check out the club’s website. It doesn’t matter that the Nelson Neptunes Swim Team is minus a home.The show will go on for the Kootenay Summer Swim Association team the Neptunes open the training season May 1 swimming five times a week at the Castlegar Aquatic Centre.After May, the Neptunes move home base to the Salmo outdoor pool for June, July and August as well as hosting a meet in June in Salmo.last_img

Read More

spzgbwxxj

‘We Knew Duncan Would Die’

first_imgNews of the death of Ebola victim in the United States, Liberian Thomas Eric Duncan, did not surprise a cross section of Liberians interviewed by the Daily Observer yesterday.“I knew he was not going to make it,” said a money changer on Benson Street, minutes after Texas Presbyterian Health officials announced his death.“Consider his situation,” the man who chose not to give his name, said. “There are at least four Americans who also got the virus, and why are they not dead?” he asked.A young Liberian female university student, 20, said, “The wicked manner that Duncan went to America, aware that he had come in contact with an Ebola patient convinced me that he would not survive his ordeal.” “Oh, did you people at the Observer ever think he was going to survive?” She answered her own rhetorical question. “I knew he would not have made it.”Others interviewed drew attention to Dr. Kent Brantly, the American doctor who got infested here in Liberia with Ebola, but was treated in a US hospital and is now free from the disease.“He is an American,” the taxi driver said, “and so they took care of him.”A mother of three on Carey Street in Monrovia also reminded the Daily Observer  of Dr. Rick Sarca, another American, who got infested while in Liberia.“Is he dead?” she posed the question to the Daily Observer.Like the two American doctors, another American, Nurse Nancy Writebol, also survived after being treated at a US hospital.Many other Liberians made mention of NBC Cameraman Ashoka Mukpo, who recently got infested and was rushed to the United States.Cameraman Mukpo has received blood donation from Dr. Kent Brantly and doctors in the United States are waiting to administer transfusion to save his life.“Why Duncan did not receive such an important gift that could have saved his life?” asked another Liberian, who said he is a student at the University of Liberia.When many of those interviewed were reminded that the Americans had begun administering a drug approved by the Federal Food and Drug Administration, FDA, on Ebola victim Duncan, they still responded that the Americans “pretended they were doing their best for him.”“They knew that the drug would not have saved Duncan’s life,” said another.  “Why are they not using the same drug on other Americans?”Many commented that the United States is a country that takes care of its own and took the Liberian government to task for its inability to care for its citizens just as Americans do for their own.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More

spzgbwxxj

Hi-tech boost for fight against rhino poaching

first_img17 December 2014Drone aircraft have helped reduce poaching incidents in the Hluhluwe-Imfolozi Park in KwaZulu-Natal by 92 percent, says Shaya E-security, builders of the drones.The drone aircraft stream live video via satellite to “armchair pilots” on the ground.The custom-made drones clocked over 3 600 flying hours across in four separate deployments across Hluhluwe-Imfolozi, which has one of the biggest rhino populations in the world.While as many as 50 rhino are killed in South Africa’s worst affected areas, not a single rhino was lost inside Hluhluwe-Imfolozi during the initial one month-long drone pilot project, Shaya says.“We’ve proved the value of drone technology in the fight against rhino poaching,” said Ben van Dyk, chief operations officer of Johannesburg-based Shaya E-security, which built the drones.“The world urgently needs a solution to the poaching crisis, and we believe we’ve found it,” Van Dyk said.Real time monitoringShaya’s drone project features a range of remote-controlled drone designs, from a five- metre wingspan craft to the much smaller battery-operated drone.Van Dyk said the key to the drones’ success was on-board sensors and high definition cameras that are capable of providing real-time monitoring across a vast wilderness area.The craft flew at an altitude of around 500 metres and reached speeds of up to 180km an hour, providing constant live video as well as thermal and infra-red surveillance.The live images could be controlled or viewed remotely on portable devices such as laptops, or even a mobile phone, enabling faster reaction time and better communication with ground teams, the company said.“Anti-Rhino Drone Operations form part of an overall strategy that includes an effective Reaction Unit, intelligence gathering, and co-operation with the local SAPS,” Van Dyk said. The park’s management had effectively co-ordinated all the elements in the fight against rhino poaching.The project, which was concluded earlier this year, could provide a model for future deployments across the country, said Shaya chief executive Ian Melamed.“The problem with fighting rhino poaching in particular is that there is so much intimidation and danger to the people on the ground fighting the poachers,” Melamed said. “As a result aerial security surveillance is a hugely viable alternative.”“Drones are no longer seen as ‘killer machines’ but have found a new purpose – protecting animal life,” Van Dyk said.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Read More

nhlnpbanj

Initial assessment of biotech regulatory documents pleases NCGA

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration published documents addressing the pre-market regulatory oversight of biotechnology-based agricultural tools. The National Corn Growers Association is pleased that the agency has included input given by NCGA and others throughout the rule-making process while focusing on the importance of science-based regulations.Corn farmers have a strong interest in the availability of new technologies to enhance the sustainability, productivity and competitiveness of U.S. agriculture. Agriculture biotechnology and next generation breeding techniques allow growers to increase yields while decreasing inputs. Meeting demand, improving processes and minimizing environmental impacts are what make modern corn production a dynamic industry. The documents published indicate that, in large part, federal agencies agree with the basis of our stance and strive to create a more efficient regulatory process allowing growers greater access to new products.NCGA continues working to fully analyze the implications and impacts of these documents with awareness of the importance of the balance of access to technology and markets.last_img read more

Read More