湖南涉外学生服务 Tag Archive

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JCB in 360-degree leader sift

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Manufacturing firm JCB has reviewed its appraisal and development programme to identify future leaders.In an ambitious use of 360-degree appraisals, which have been abandoned by some organisations as being too time-consuming, it has generated information on the skills and development needs of all its 200 senior managers. This is fed into an automated system that collects and interprets the data, available to the senior HR and training team.The practice involves canvassing the views from all the individuals – colleagues, subordinates, customers and line manager – the manager deals with.JCB uses it for succession planning, after concluding that less rigorous methods provided insufficient data and led to overly subjective decisions on promotions.“It allows us to make better, more informed decisions, to plan organisational and personal developmental strategies and to benchmark our people against other world-leading companies,” said Paul Pritchard, JCB head of training and development.Core skills requirements for each management position were established through interviews with executive directors. Training and development is available to managers via the company’s intranet.Use of 360-degree appraisal has had a chequered past, with some firms finding that managers were uncomfortable with staff views being taken into account, especially where appraisals have been linked to pay. But many HR consultants argue that it is a powerful tool if it is restricted to giving information on areas for personal development. “It has to be located in the context of other things that work, such as people having a proper objectives and targets and knowing what it is they are meant to be achieving,” said HR consultant Rhiannon Chapman. By Philip Whiteley JCB in 360-degree leader siftOn 3 Oct 2000 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Neil Young’s Free Comprehensive Online Archive Is Officially Live [Video]

first_imgIn addition to explaining the various new features of this platform, the widely noted audiophile explains the dynamic audio quality characteristics that make this the optimal way to listen to his music. The archive uses Young’s Xstream Music hi-fi streaming infrastructure. “Xstream Music master recordings are always pure uncompressed masters,” Young notes. “They are not part of a format that compromises the quality. All compression formats compromise quality.” As he explains, the streaming “adapts seamlessly” to available output bandwidth (i.e. how nice your speakers are) in order to provide “the best audio quality possible, directly from the original high resolution masters.”The creation of the Neil Young archives seems to be a logical progression for the outspoken artist. He has long been an evangelist for high-quality sound, creating a hi-fi music player (the not-so-successful PONO) launching his own hi-def streaming service, Xstream Music, after publicly lambasting large-scale streaming platforms like Spotify and Apple Music for their poor sound quality. Now the world can experience the complete, annotated works of Neil Young, free of charge, and in the highest possible quality–exactly how Neil wants it to be.You can check out the now-unlocked Neil Young Archives here.[Cover photo (Neil) by Gabriel Grams/Rex via Rolling Stone] This week, Neil Young officially launched the Neil Young Archives, a comprehensive interactive online repository of all things Neil, from photos and stories to a complete, high-fidelity streaming of his entire decades-long catalogue of recorded music. In a Facebook post last month, Young made reference to a “big day” coming up on December 1st: In addition to referencing the release of The Visitor, his second studio album with Promise of the Real, he also made casual mention of a big surprise announcement: “My archive will open on that same day, a place you can visit and experience every song I have ever released in the highest quality your machine will allow. It’s the way it’s supposed to be. In the beginning, everything is free.”Read Neil Young’s official introductory note for the Neil Young Archives here. Young explained the new archive project in a note on the website before its launch: the details of the new Neil Young Archives are displayed, giving some first-hand insight into this new platform. “Welcome to NYA,” it reads, “the home of my music. I must admit that I built this for myself as much as for everyone else…” In the note, Young starts by laying out the Neil Young Archives’ “mission statement,” making clear his intentions for the archives to be a living, breathing, evolving project: “We have attempted to highlight the creative process and the creators…The musical information found here is a work in progress, always growing and adapting as we find it. We have done our best to find all of the background pertinent to the music. If you have any more, please reach out to us with it. We are always looking.”Celebrate Neil Young’s 72nd Birthday With The Fateful Tale Behind His ’72 Classic, “Harvest” The archive details Young’s extensive discography with a Timeline feature cataloging every single recorded track or album he’s ever produced. There’s also a Filing Cabinet organizing all the songs in chronological order, complete with Info Cards containing associated credits, memorabilia, films or video, press, and photographs.Below, you can watch the official Neil Young Archives tutorial video (narrated by Neil himself) to familiarize yourself with all the various functions of this extensive entertainment and educational resource:last_img read more

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Jazz as conversation

first_imgGreat jazz requires a strange alchemy of instinct and expertise, of empathy and teamwork from its musicians — a fact few know better than famed artist and composer Wynton Marsalis. Jazz is a conversation, but a nuanced, swift, and complicated one, he said.At Sanders Theatre on Wednesday, Marsalis and a band of all-star musicians both discussed and demonstrated how to achieve that balance in “At the Speed of Instinct: Choosing Together to Play and Stay Together,” the fourth of Marsalis’ six-part lecture series at Harvard that began in 2011. Coming just two day’s after Monday’s bombings at the Boston Marathon, the performance provided a collective respite for the campus.“No one knows better than Wynton that art and music are for times of sorrow as well as celebration, that the community they build is more important than ever as we turn to one another for comfort and for strength,” President Drew Faust said at the start of program. “He shows us that music is a means of capturing human experience that connects us to something larger than ourselves.”“No one knows better than Wynton that art and music are for times of sorrow as well as celebration,” said President Drew Faust at the start of the program.Marsalis and his band began the night by playing a piece that Marsalis had written earlier that day to commemorate the city’s, and the country’s, anguish over the bombings.“Sometimes the expression of grief is such a heavy feeling that only playing will suffice,” said Marsalis, managing and artistic director of jazz at Lincoln Center.Jazz’s ability to resonate with people in times of deep sadness — or carefree happiness — stems in part from its ability to both harness and transcend time, to capture a moment and build on it through improvisation, he said.“Ours is a time-obsessed time,” he said. “The art of jazz is the mastery of time, thousands of decisions made in an instant for the duration of a song. When we play, there is a supreme cognizance of the present, of the energy in being present, and of the intensity of presenting a collective insight into successive moments of present-ness.“Hmm, that’s a mouthful,” he added.Jazz musicians’ constant adjustments, their awareness of things changing from moment to moment, make jazz unique among Western dance music, he said.“Together, you discover that adjusting to one another is as important a skill as soloing,” he said.Jazz offers other unexpected lessons as well, he said: that sometimes the best solution to a group’s problem is not to play, that sometimes “you can create more freedom by sacrificing your own.”With its intense focus on time, jazz teaches that “everyone lives with their own relationship to time,” he said. “Jazz people will never press you about where you were or who you were with or what time you did this or that.”And in a nation that is engaged in constant battles over cultural change, jazz offers “the art of managing change without losing the focus on substance.”As technology takes over more and more aspects of daily life, he said, jazz can remind Americans to connect with each other, and to their musical and cultural history. After all, you can’t play good jazz without being rooted in the moment and focusing on your fellow musicians — a rare thing in an era when much of popular music can be produced without two musicians ever setting foot in the same room, he added.“Jazz teaches you how to be a person, and how to ripen your personhood through empathy,” Marsalis said. “Even at its most complex, it tells you: Everything is going to work out because we’re going to make it work out.”In the performance’s second half, Marsalis and his band — tenor saxophonist Walter Blanding, bassist Carlos Henriquez, drummer Ali Jackson, and pianist Marcus Roberts — brought Marsalis’ insights to life.They walked the audience through four foundational jazz styles (swing, blues, Afro-Cuban Hispanic, and ballad), stopping after each one to explain how they had played off the others, had read their decisions, and had reacted to where the improvisation was headed.Often, that means listening with as much intensity as you play, the musicians said. In a way, the band’s playing amounted to a conversation that none but the most trained members of audience could understand.“It’s like if you’re talking to somebody — they want to talk too,” Roberts said.Blanding agreed that listening was crucial.“That collective intelligence matters,” Blanding said. When he isn’t playing sax, he said, he could start thinking about what he’d play next. But that approach doesn’t always work: “When you try to reattach yourself to what’s happening [with the rest of the band], you often find yourself out of place.”The band’s instinctual interactions require a “tremendous amount of concentration,” Marsalis said, that can take years of practice for its members to master. It also requires humility and restraint, especially from the rhythm section, Jackson said.“Drums have a lot of power, so you have to be sensitive about the use of the power,” he said. “It’s like if a king just killed his whole community — there’d be nobody to worship him.”The band, and the audience, laughed. “That was a real look into the psychology of a drummer,” Marsalis said.last_img read more

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6 important credit lessons your parents didn’t teach you

first_img 45SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr It can be challenging to listen to the wisdom of the generations before us. (We all have to make our own mistakes, right?) But when it comes to perfecting your credit score, learning by example can save you money down the line. Analyzing every detail of your parents’ credit history can be close to impossible, but you most likely will learn some key credit lessons that are long overdue their time in the spotlight. When it comes time to perfect your score (hint, that time is now), heed these six credit lessons that we wish our parents had taught us.1. Paying interest is one tough choreLet’s be real: Making monthly credit card payments isn’t fun. But the pain (literally) compounds when you top off your monthly bill with interest payments. With many credit cards carrying an interest rate above 12%, missing even one payment can result in a large (and painful) interest payment.We wish Mom had said: “Paying interest is like scraping your knee in the same spot every day.” continue reading »last_img read more

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Leeds residential: Where there’s muck …

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Football not shabby, but transition still ongoing

first_imgUW quarterback John Stocco was 29-7 as a starter in his three-year career.[/media-credit]In the past decade, Wisconsin football fans have witnessed the end of legendary coach Barry Alvarez’s career and the beginning of a new Bret Bielema era, and they have witnessed plenty of winning seasons along the way.Under Alvarez, the Badgers kicked off the decade with a win on New Year’s Day in the 2000 Rose Bowl. UW defeated Stanford thanks to first-year starter Brooks Bollinger and Heisman Trophy winner Ron Dayne’s MVP performance.It would be the final game of Dayne’s storied collegiate career, but the running back tradition at UW was far from over.The following year, led by running back Anthony Davis, the Badgers won the Sun Bowl, but the next few seasons were difficult ones for UW. From 2001 through 2003, the Badgers finished no better than seventh in the Big Ten.In 2004, the Badgers climbed back into the Big Ten title race, finishing third in the conference with John Stocco as the new signal caller and defensive end Erasmus James combining with safety Jim Leonhard to anchor a relentless defense. A loss to Georgia in the Outback Bowl ended the season for UW, but the 9-3 season featured a much-improved football team.In 2005, the Badgers built on that success.Brian Calhoun stepped in to replace Davis, and he produced over 1,600 yards and 22 touchdowns as the Badgers reeled off another nine-win regular season. This time, UW capped the season off with a victory as Wisconsin beat Auburn in the Capital One Bowl despite being heavy underdogs.The victory over Auburn would be Alvarez’s last as a head coach. Alvarez — the most successful coach in Wisconsin football history — became UW’s athletic director, a position he still holds today, and he handpicked young defensive coordinator Bret Bielema as his successor.The new head coach was nearly perfect in his first season.True freshman running back P.J. Hill took over for Calhoun, who left early for the NFL, and Hill produced a season good enough to be named National Freshman of the Year. The Badgers would only lose once in the 2006 season as UW tied for second place in the Big Ten and earned another invitation to the Capital One Bowl.Same bowl, same result, but this time the Badgers beat Arkansas en route to a school-best 12-1 season.The Badgers went 9-4 in 2007, losing to Tennessee in the Outback Bowl, and in 2008, the Badgers suffered through a dreadful 7-6 season that culminated with a blowout loss to Florida State in the Champs Sports Bowl.This year, the Badgers are once again heading to Orlando for the Champs Sports Bowl, but a much different team is making the trip. The Badgers entered the 2009 season with a renewed focus, and with John Clay leading the way as Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year, the Badgers finished the regular season with nine wins.The past decade has been one of the most successful eras in Wisconsin football history with Alvarez leading the way and Bielema taking over as the new face of the program.With a lot of young talent, strong recruiting classes and a maturing coaching staff in place, Badger fans should expect that success to continue into the next decade.last_img read more

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