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Special Olympians to receive heroes’ welcome in Letterkenny

first_img NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Previous articleWoman who claimed abuse by Irish dancing teacher wins civil caseNext article“Malin Waters” is the new consumer brand of the Sail West initiative News Highland Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson 448 new cases of Covid 19 reported today RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Help sought in search for missing 27 year old in Letterkenny Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Special Olympians to receive heroes’ welcome in Letterkenny Google+center_img WhatsApp Twitter By News Highland – July 5, 2011 Newsx Adverts Facebook Google+ Twitter Donegal’s Special Olympians are on their way back to the county this evening, with all eight of them bringing home silver medals.The eight are footballers Oliver Boyle,  Hugh Sweeney, Adrian Clarke,  Stephen Nesbitt,  Gareth Egan, Luke Egan and Mario McShane, as well as Letterkenny kayaker Shaun Bradley.The team, who arrived at Dublin Airport at lunchtime, are being met at Station Roundabout in Letterkenny at 6 o’clock, and will then be paraded to Market Square for a reception.Letterkenny’s Mayor Cllr Gerry Mc Monagle is urging people to come out to welcome the team home to acknowledge what they and their have achieved……[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/welcome.mp3[/podcast] Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Pinterestlast_img read more

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‘The worst is behind us’: COVID virus ebbs, lending hope to a nation lashed by disease

first_imgLeoPatrizi/iStock(NEW YORK) — The virus causing COVID-19 has begun to recede, just slightly, in the U.S.As experts predicted, the pandemic is operating on less of a light switch than a dimmer — dialing back and forth in different pockets of the country. For once though, it seems, the nation’s pandemic dimmer is turning in the right direction.“I think we can confidently say the worst is behind us barring some crazy unforeseen variant that none of us are expecting to see,” said Dr. Ashish K. Jha, dean of the health Brown University School of Public Health.“We will not see the kind of suffering and death we have seen over the holidays. I think we are in much better shape heading forward,” Jha told ABC’s Good Morning America Friday.More than half the country — 26 states — has reported declining case numbers in the last week with new cases down 18 percent. Deaths and hospitalizations are down too. Even Michigan, the U.S. hotspot this spring, has seen its daily case average drop by more than 36 percent, according to data by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.“We think this is related to increased vaccination, increased people taking caution, and so I’m cautiously optimistic that we’re turning the corner,” CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky told GMA this week.The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, which conducts its own weekly forecast, called it “clear evidence that transmission is falling” and predicted the trend would continue.“Much of the improvements can be tied to increasing vaccination rates among younger and middle-age adults,” the hospital’s PolicyLab concluded this week.That cautious optimism comes with big caveats. Health experts predict the nearly 100 million Americans who are fully vaccinated isn’t nearly enough to crush the pandemic. While that represents some 30 percent of the population, it’s estimated some 70-85 percent of the country would have to be protected for “herd immunity” to take effect. Past infection of the virus might not count either because it’s unknown how long immunity lasts.In Oregon, for example, officials warned cases were surging and hospitalizations doubled in the past two weeks, a trend driven by younger unvaccinated residents.Also, as the U.S. situation improves, the global situation is still tenuous. India is deteriorating and its health system broken by a massive outbreak this spring. Other countries too have struggled to contain outbreaks, making it more likely that as the virus spreads unchecked, new variants will form.“This can happen in a number of countries, in any countries if we let our guard down. I’m not saying that India has let its guard down but I’m saying we’re in a fragile situation,” said Dr. Maria Van Kerkhove, the World Health Organization’s technical lead for COVID-19, at a press conference this week.So far, the vaccines offered in the U.S. are believed to provide protection against global variants. But the worst case scenario, health experts say, is that a new strain will develop overseas that is smarter at evading the body’s immune system, chipping away at the vaccine’s protection.In other words, it’s possible that a lesser version of the pandemic will drag on for months in a kind of game of Whack-a-Mole. Communities with high vaccination rates would enjoy more freedom from the virus, whereas areas with more reluctance might contend with flareups. If global variants arrive, as is almost certain as travel resumes, the U.S. will scramble to deliver booster shots.Still, even with all the warnings that the pandemic isn’t over, signs of life are returning. Louisiana convened its state fair Thursday, after canceling it last fall, and promised a second festival in fall. California’s Disney Land reopened Friday and water parks were planning to reopen this summer, after last year’s lost season.Perhaps the biggest sign of life returning to the U.S. was the announcement that New York City would fully reopen July 1 with large Broadway productions expected this fall.“This is going to be the summer of New York City,” Mayor Bill de Blasio declared triumphantly this week. “I think people are going to flock to New York City because they want to live again.”Other local officials are ready to declare the pandemic over, even with some 50,000 cases averaging a day in the country.“A widely available vaccine changes everything and it’s a new season in Tennessee,” said Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee. “I am not renewing any public health orders because COVID-19 is no longer a health emergency in our state.”Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Belo, Frey pace Montana State past Southern Utah 73-65

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) — Jubrile Belo had 25 points plus 11 rebounds as Montana State topped Southern Utah 73-65.Harald Frey added 22 points for the Bobcats, making 7 of 10 from the field including four 3-pointers, Belo shot 13-for-16 from the line and recorded his fifth double-double of the season and second in as many games.Dwayne Morgan and Dre Marin each had 15 points for the Thunderbirds. Tags: Big Sky/Harald Frey/Jubrile Belo/Montana State Bobcats/SUU Thunderbirds Basketball Associated Press Written by March 5, 2020 /Sports News – Local Belo, Frey pace Montana State past Southern Utah 73-65last_img

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Parsing the Mueller report

first_img Co-author Sarah Grant’s stories on Steele dossier and Watergate ‘road map’ are much-discussed WHITING: To me, that now is going to be a bit of a sideshow because so much of the report is unredacted and Barr said the chairpersons of the committees will be able to see the full unredacted report except for the grand jury redactions — which is almost everything. To me, that’s now going to be a side issue. The big question is what Congress and maybe ultimately the American public do with this mountain of facts and this narrative with respect to the collusion evidence, but more particularly, the obstruction evidence.GAZETTE: Of course, impeachment is a political process, not a legal one, and proceeding with it doesn’t require first proving that the president committed a crime. In remarks about the Office of Legal Counsel opinion regarding indicting a president, Mueller notes in the report that the team sought to preserve evidence it collected in light of that prohibition being lifted once the president is out of office. Could Trump still face charges at a future date or are the legal remedies now closed?WHITING: It’s hard for me to imagine that would actually happen. I don’t anticipate that he’s going to be impeached on the basis of this; I just don’t think it will end up that way. And if he ends up losing the next election, I wouldn’t imagine that the Justice Department would pursue criminal charges, not on obstruction. So now, it’s largely a political question.This interview has been edited for clarity and length. Related Mulling the Mueller report Findings will likely be released, panelists agree, but the question is how Hooked on Mueller probe? Law School student’s blog posts are must-reads Nearly a month after special counsel Robert Mueller handed in his report to U.S. Attorney General William Barr on the 22-month investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election, the public finally got its first look at the document Thursday.As expected, the 448-page report confirms that Mueller did not find sufficient evidence that the president or his campaign associates coordinated with Russia’s election interference effort. But contrary to Barr’s assertions that Mueller was unable to reach a conclusion on whether President Trump obstructed justice in trying to stop the probe, the report actually says the special counsel felt bound by Department of Justice policy that prohibits bringing charges against a sitting president and therefore did not try to reach a prosecutorial decision.With surprisingly few redactions, the report reveals a dizzying roster of Russians and Americans involved in the Trump campaign who actively connected, talked, and then met with one another starting in 2015 (although Trump, his attorney Michael Cohen, and Trump’s adult children were in communication with Russian officials as early as 2013 to discuss the Trump Tower Moscow project). The richly detailed report also chronicles Trump’s activities once he became president and how he repeatedly sought to defuse or derail first the FBI’s counterintelligence investigation and then Mueller’s probe, which began in May of 2017.To start to make sense of it all, hours after the report was released, the Gazette spoke with former prosecutor Alex Whiting, a professor of practice at Harvard Law School who teaches issues and procedures related to domestic and international criminal prosecutions. He serves on the board of editors and writes regularly for Just Security, a popular U.S. national security law and policy website. From 2010 to 2013, Whiting supervised prosecutions in the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court in the Hague.Q&AAlex WhitingGAZETTE: What’s your initial reaction to what is described in the report? From your first read, what are the big takeaways?WHITING: I focused on the obstruction part; that’s been my interest.Harvard Law School professor Alex WhitingIt’s pretty devastating for a number of reasons. First, as we knew already from Barr’s letter, Mueller did not make a final determination on the obstruction part. He had exonerated the president on the collusion part, but had not made a judgment on the obstruction part. There was a lot of debate about that and why he did that. And the suggestion was that it was because it was perhaps too close a call. That turns out not to be the case. The only reason he didn’t make a call is because the Justice Department has a policy that a sitting president cannot be indicted. And it was solely out of respect to that policy that Mueller declined to make an ultimate call with respect to the obstruction charges. And he specifically said if they had clearly found insufficient evidence of obstruction they would have said so. In other words, reading between the lines, they found substantial evidence of obstruction of justice, if not sufficient evidence, to bring prosecution were they permitted under Justice Department policy. That’s an important conclusion right off the bat.The second thing is there were questions about whether there were legal prohibitions or legal problems with bringing an obstruction of justice charge because of the way the statute was written, but more particularly because of the position of the president. He is both in charge of the executive in charge of the investigation and he is a subject of the investigation. So there were questions about whether an obstruction statute would interfere with his duties as president to oversee the executive branch. And the report is dismissive of any of those legal problems of bringing an obstruction charge. What the report concludes is there are no legal bars — there are only evidentiary questions about whether the evidence is sufficient.On the question of the evidence, the report lays out the full picture of the president’s conduct with respect to the investigation. There’s a range of acts which can be fairly construed as seeking to shape the investigation, interfere with it, shut it down, mislead it, derail it — all of those things. The evidence is laid out in detail and the report finds in a number of places where it is substantially corroborated. It points to a pattern of conduct that I think can only be seen as obstructive. The only remaining question is whether the president, in doing those things, had a “corrupt motive,” which is required under the statute. That’s really the only question. And there, the report suggests the president saw the investigation as a threat, he saw it as potentially undermining his political standing, his own personal standing, and it was for that reason that he was trying to shut down and end the investigation — to avoid political consequences or embarrassment. And that is sufficient under the obstruction statute. So even though there isn’t evidence he was trying to obstruct justice to cover up a crime, because the special counsel found there was insufficient evidence of an underlying crime, there were other reasons why he would personally benefit from shutting down the investigation, and those seem to be very much at play and sufficient for an obstruction charge.GAZETTE: Is it more or less helpful to Trump than you anticipated?WHITING: I think it’s less helpful. After the [March 24] Barr letter, there were some rumblings that the report was actually much more critical and much more of a problem for the president than the Barr letter let on. And I think that’s absolutely true. On the obstruction part, he’s worse off today than he was yesterday.GAZETTE: Does it appear the investigation was wrapped up before Mueller was ready?WHITING: No, I don’t see any indication of that. The report does address the question of why they didn’t subpoena the president to the grand jury, and they conclude that legally they could have, but they decided it would have unnecessarily delayed wrapping up the investigation and that they likely would not have gotten more than they already knew. But that was Mueller’s decision; that was not Barr’s decision, and there’s no indication that he shut it down. GAZETTE: In the report, Mueller states that he and his team did not try to reach a decision on whether or not to prosecute given the overarching constraint that presidents cannot be indicted while in office according to Office of Legal Counsel guidance. But he also writes that the available facts and legal standards of the investigation “prevent us from conclusively determining that no criminal conduct occurred.” What do you make of that statement? “On the obstruction part, he’s worse off today than he was yesterday.” The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. WHITING: It’s not remarkable that Mueller was following the DOJ policy about not indicting a sitting president. Most people thought that that’s where he was headed. However, what was left open was whether he would reach any conclusions about whether Trump had broken the law. I think it’s news that the reason he didn’t reach that conclusion was because of the policy. That makes sense; if you can’t indict the president, the special counsel probably shouldn’t reach that conclusion. People can argue about that, but that’s certainly a defensible position.GAZETTE: There aren’t as many redactions as many people expected. But what can we learn from what is redacted, especially in the “ongoing investigation” category? Can we infer from that we’ll see future indictments against those in sections with heavy redactions, like Julian Assange/WikiLeaks and Jerome Corsi?WHITING: That may be so on the collusion side, but on the obstruction side, it looks like the redactions I’ve seen may have to do with some of the cases that haven’t completely wrapped up. For example, the Roger Stone case. But yes, it may be that there are future indictments; I think that’s absolutely right.GAZETTE: Do there appear to be areas of inquiry that may have fallen outside the narrow scope of Mueller’s probe on Russia and the election that another investigative body — say a federal prosecutor’s office, a Congressional committee, a state attorney general, or state regulators — could or should look into? If so, what are some of those and who would investigate it?WHITING: I haven’t read enough to know yet.GAZETTE: The president and his supporters now say that the report has been made public and the Trump-Russia subject is closed. Is that a fair conclusion?WHITING: No. That’s wishful thinking. This report is now going to have to be digested, and I think the obstruction section certainly provides a basis for further Congressional hearings and inquiries. Whether, as a political matter, the Democrats want to pursue that, that’s a separate question. There are certainly some serious legal questions to look into and think about. So no, this is not going away.GAZETTE: Which legal questions, for example?WHITING: The questions about obstruction: Whether the president engaged in a pattern of obstruction of justice and whether that’s impeachable. We have gone down the road a couple times on [presidential] impeachment where there has been obstruction of justice. And I think Congress is at least going to have to face that issue because of the evidence laid out here.GAZETTE: What do you expect will happen next? Congressional committees seeking to obtain completely unredacted copies of the report had threatened to issue subpoenas. Is that now academic?last_img read more

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8th Annual Flying Model Expo @ Cradle of Aviation

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Matthew R. checks out the prop on one of the many Model Airplanes on display at the Cradle’s Annual ExpoThe Cradle of Aviation Museum will hold the Eighth Annual Flying Model Expo on Saturday May 18th and Sunday May 19th from 10:00 am – 5:00 pm. Each year the event continues to grow and attract hundreds of model builders, collectors and beginners to the largest event of its kind on Long Island.The Expo provides model builders and flying model fans with a wonderful opportunity to see some of the best in class in model aircraft.  Everything from electric, gas, RC, rubber-powered, gliders, helicopters and more will be on display throughout the museum.  Plus, special free family activities will be available for junior flyers throughout the weekend.Outdoor flying demonstrations will take place in front of the museum both Saturday and Sunday, weather permitting.  Flying demonstrations of some RC electric airplanes will take place throughout the day in the museum.  The Expo will have representatives from Flying Model clubs from all over the metropolitan area.  A wealth of model building and flying experience will be on hand for anyone interested in either getting started or if you’re looking to perfect your own model.Admission to the Flying Model Expo is free with your admission to the Aviation Museum galleries.  The Cradle of Aviation Museum is home to over 75 air and space craft representing over 100 years of aviation history.  The museum is located on Museum Row, Charles Lindbergh Boulevard in Garden City/Uniondale area.  Directions to the museum are to take the Meadowbrook Parkways to exit M4 West, and then follow signs to Museum Row.  For information call 516-572-4111 or log onto www.cradleofaviation.org.last_img read more

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Plea to stay at Nice

first_imgReported Stoke target Alassane Plea has pledged his future to Nice for at least another season. The 22-year-old winger started 27 games in Ligue 1, contributing three goals and seven assists, after signing from Lyon last summer. That has led to speculation over his future but he told L’Equipe: “I will spend the season here. “There are English clubs interested but it is a bit too soon to leave.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Seven Up for Aspire Global through Irish sportsbook licence

first_img Irish bookmakers demand clarity on reopening orders June 17, 2020 Aspire Global has seen its pool of sportsbook licences increase to seven, after being granted the necessary approval from the Irish sports betting authority.The new licence, which is likely to be complemented by an eighth in Sweden in early 2019, will increase Aspire’s share of revenues generated from regulated or soon-to-be regulated markets.The firm’s other licences are for the UK, Denmark, Belgium, Portugal and Italy, as well as a Maltese licence that permits operation in dot com markets.Tsachi Maimon, CEO of Aspire Global, commented: “We are excited to add an Irish sports license to our portfolio, expanding the sports vertical to yet another regulated market and enabling our partners to target new audiences through a wider offering.”He added: “Our consistent focus on regulated markets enables exciting business opportunities, increased competitive advantages and sustainable growth.”Last month, the Irish government announced a doubling of betting duty to 2% of turnover in its 2019 Budget (with exchange duty increasing by two-thirds to 25%) – effective from 1 January 2019.However, the implementation of this tax hike has since been thrown into doubt after the Irish Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe said that it would be reviewed, after warnings from Irish Bookmakers Association (IBA) that the move would lead to significant job losses.Outside of Ireland, last month saw an important event for Aspire’s sports solution, as BetRegal became the first dedicated sports operator to switch from a competing platform. The BetRegal sportsbook has migrated from EveryMatrix to an SBTech front-end, run through the Aspire platform. Submit Share Kambi and DraftKings agree on final closure terms July 24, 2020 Related Articles Kambi takes control of Churchill Downs BetAmerica sportsbook August 28, 2020 Share StumbleUponlast_img read more

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