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Hope India get past big games and win ICC trophy in next

first_imgMumbai: Sourav Ganguly on Friday hoped the reappointment of the familiar Ravi Shastri as head coach will help India prevail in the “big games” and break the jinx of not winning a major ICC tournament in recent years. Shastri was recently reappointed for two years by the Kapil Dev-led Cricket Advisory Committee (CAC). “Ravi has been around for a while, five years he’s completed so he’s got an extension for two more years. Hopefully now India can go all the way in the two upcoming tournaments that are coming up, which is the T20 World Cup and the Champions Trophy which has now become a T20 format,” Ganguly said. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh”So I hope they do well, they’re doing well, they get to the semi-finals. “In 2015 in Australia they struggled, in 2017 (2016) in Mumbai, West Indies got the better of them and even in this World Cup. So, hopefully, they will get to the next step and create a winning combination.” India’s last ICC tournament triumph was the win in the 2013 Champions Trophy. “Hopefully they can get past the big games and win trophies in the next two years,” said the former captain who is not the best of friends with Shastri. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced laterGanguly urged captain Virat Kohli to continue giving the new players a longer run to prove their mettle. “This is one area where Virat (Kohli) needs to just be a bit more consistent — pick players and give them a bit more opportunities consistently — for them to get that confidence, rhythm. “I have said that before. You saw how Shreyas Iyer played in that ODI series (against West Indies), you pick him and you give him the freedom to play those matches and I think that needs to happen with a lot of players and I am sure Virat will do that,” added Ganguly.last_img read more

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Thank you note from Trump is memorabilia for Newfoundland political watcher

first_imgBAULINE, N.L. – In a world of political cynicism and voter apathy, Doug Kavanagh is the ultimate engaged citizen.And now his growing collection of correspondence with leaders and news editors across Canada and the world has another addition: a thank-you note from U.S. President Donald Trump.“Dear Douglas,” reads the emailed letter marked “The White House” under the presidential seal. “Thank you for your kind letter and generous words of support.“Your encouragement, and that of millions around the world, sustains us every step of the way. Thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts.”Kavanagh, a 62-year-old electrician from Bauline, N.L., said it showed up in his email Tuesday after he wrote Trump three times in recent months offering feedback.It’s the sort of standard response sent to thousands of other people, he said. But it means more to the avid letter-writer and political watcher who says he has reached out to people in power since he was a teenager.“It’s memorabilia to me,” he said in an interview. “When different issues come up, I think that if you don’t say something, you don’t make a difference. I just try to participate but I don’t want to be part of the political system. It’s kind of like planting a seed, I guess.”Kavanagh said he voted Liberal in both the last federal and provincial elections because he wanted change. He has also voted Progressive Conservative in the past.Trump’s promises to bring back blue-collar jobs especially appealed to him, he said, although Kavanagh wants to see more progress on that front.“I do have concerns because, the thing is, I want the states to do well. If the states do well, Canada can’t help but do better.”He wrote to Trump to express his view that the U.S. can’t afford to be a world police force. He pushed for more military defence spending by NATO members. And he cited issues around the so-called “Trojan Horse” threat of ISIS terrorists entering countries posing as refugees — a concern Trump also repeatedly voiced during the presidential campaign.Kavanagh has correspondence from a long line of provincial premiers, including Clyde Wells, Danny Williams and most recently Dwight Ball, with whom he raised soaring costs for the $12.7-billion Muskrat Falls hydro project in Labrador.“I never write and attack a leader or anything like that. I try to be as positive as possible.”In the 1990s, Kavanagh said he wrote to every major newspaper editor in the U.S. to defend Newfoundland and Labrador’s commercial seal hunt from attacks by animal rights groups.His interest in politics and how policies take shape — which he admits is at times “a bit of an obsession” — is a mystery to many people, he said with a laugh.“Even my brother says to me: ‘You’re not still for that guy Trump are you?’ I say, ‘I’m not for anybody. I’m just giving my opinion.’“You’ve got to have some kind of voice.”Follow @suebailey on Twitter.last_img read more

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Advocate calls for full review of Indigenous Affairs departments and bureaucrats that

first_imgMark Blackburn APTN NewsThe executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society is calling for a complete review of both departments under the Indigenous Affairs umbrella and the bureaucrats running them.“The operating system in INAC is still protecting what the bureaucrats think what the government’s interests are,” said Cindy Blackstock. “At some level, I think for many it’s what their interests are – they can get promoted and rewarded and conformity and that means a kind of status quo at INAC.”Blackstock is calling on Canada to implement what is called a 360-degree review of the two departments responsible for First Nations, Metis and Inuit issues – because she isn’t convinced that change can come from within.“One of the questions I asked the bureaucrats at INAC after the (human rights tribunal) decision and have asked it consistently since then is, what did you learn from the tribunal’s decision about the way the department thinks and acts in ways that discriminate against little kids? What did you learn about that and how have you reformed yourself internally so that you do not repeat these patterns of behaviour?“And they can never answer that question.”Blackstock took the federal government to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal over a decade ago for discriminating against First Nations children, saying the government underfunded programs. The tribunal ruled in her favour in January 2016.Reform is what the Liberal government promised during the election that swept them to power in 2015.Ministers are still promising it.“We are working towards getting out from underneath this broken system,” Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott said during a speech at the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) special chiefs assembly in Ottawa last week.But some say they haven’t seen any change.Oneida of the Thames Chief Randall Phillips is one of them.“I’m spitting mad,” Phillips told APTN News at the AFN gathering. “Absolutely nothing has changed in that regard.”Phillips was also angry about comments Philpott made at the AFN gathering about her bureaucrats“Bureaucrats are good,” she said. “They want to do the right thing. But they worked in a former department of Indigenous Affairs that worked in an era of denial.“We are working to turn that around”But despite Philpott talking up her worker bees, Phillips said it doesn’t ring true.“I don’t buy it for one second,” Phillips said, pointing towards the room where Philpott was speaking. “I don’t buy it for one second that what they’re saying now is all they need was a culture change and leadership from the top. They’ve had ministers before who said that they wanted to work with First Nations and move these things in a positive way but they (bureaucrats) kept on saying no.“So what is going to change? In my mind, absolutely nothing.”This year’s edition of the AFN’s Christmas assembly had its usual parade of cabinet ministers promising a number of changes.Carolyn Bennett, the minister for Indigenous-Crown Relations, spoke of the now common theme of the importance of the government’s nation-to-nation relationship with communities.She ran through a history lesson that irked some chiefs – but received a polite reception.Some ministers did not get the reception they were looking for.Sources told APTN that with the aid of a French and English translator, Canada Revenue Agency Minister Diane Lebouthillier held a closed-door session with chiefs to talk about the OI Leasing debacle.Bureaucrats within Lebouthillier’s department, with the support of the courts, have forced employees of OI Leasing, including a number of past and present employees of APTN, to pay thousands of dollars in income taxes, after they believed they were exempt because the leasing office was located on Six Nations, near Hamilton, Ont.According to the sources, what was supposed to be a speech, followed by a question and answer session between chiefs and the minister, turned heated with pointed comments aimed at Lebouthillier and her bureaucrats about the department’s handling of the file.She left without answering questions.That was followed by Philpott who took to the podium in the main assembly and promised more money for First Nations child welfare ahead of an “emergency” meeting scheduled for some time early next year and to keep learning about the issues that need addressing.“I acknowledge there is a lot that I don’t know … but I want to learn from you,” Philpott said.Phillips said he likes Philpott – and her energy – but he said red flags went up when she made that comment.“She don’t understand our issues,” he said. “So again we’re relying on bureaucrats that have been fighting us for 150 years to say this is what they want and this is how we should do it – it’s not going to happen. It’s going to happen in someone’s utopian mind, it’s not going to happen on the ground. I’ve been dealing with this for 37 years – nothing has changed.”In Alberta, the chief of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation is also in constant contact with the bureaucracy.Allan Adams has been in a pitched battle with the province over the tar sands.He said the issues with bureaucrats crosses from the federal government to province.“You know we went through the same changes in Alberta with the NDP government and we thought when the NDP government came in that things would change,” Adams said. “The only thing that changed was the government.“The bureaucrats are still there, the issues are still there, the issues haven’t gone anywhere – the same process goes over to Canada on a national scope. We had Conservatives exit with the bureaucrats in place, only the political party has changed, the system hasn’t changed at all.”Adams said he will go to meetings with five or six ministers who are surrounded by bureaucrats and he said he’s not clear who is running the show.“You have a process, you have a system, you have things that are in place that they have to follow and bureaucrats follow a system. Unless ministers want to bring changes to that system, well then show it to me. Where are the changes coming in the legislation? That is the only time you’ll be able to make a change to the bureaucrat’s system and if you don’t do that then you don’t have the mechanism or mandate to make any changes,” he said.Cindy Blackstock is currently working at McGill University in Montreal preparing to teach a First Peoples course in January.There, students will choose one of the Truth and Reconciliation’s calls to action and write an implementation plan.They might learn about the time she was escorted from a government office when a member of the minister of Aboriginal Affairs staff learned she was attending a meeting between chiefs and bureaucrats over child welfare.Or about the time, first reported by APTN in 2011, when federal government bureaucrats under the Stephen Harper administration in the former Aboriginal Affairs and Justice departments were spying on her online and tracking the content of her public speaking engagements after she filed a human rights complaint against Canada over First Nations child welfare.“(The two departments) have repeatedly accessed, viewed, read, copied and recorded personal information from (Blackstock’s) personal Facebook page,” said a 2013 report from Canada’s privacy commissioner.But what about today?“I operate as if I am (being spied on) because when it was over with my counsel asked the department to sign an undertaking saying that the surveillance had stopped – and they wouldn’t do it. So I have no assurance that they’ve done it,” she said.Blackstock said there have been some changes in the bureaucracy at the First Nations Inuit Health Branch.“They have Valerie Giddeon, who is First Nations and worked a lot in this area, and I think she has helped shift that relationship,” she said. “So the department isn’t spending the lion’s share of its time defending its definition of Jordan’s Principle, but is instead recalibrating its efforts towards compliance with the orders.”After tribunal ruled against the government, it has issued several non-compliance orders against Ottawa for not following through with its ruling.As for the 360 review, said bilingualism needs to be addressed because the requirement for high-level jobs eliminates many talented Indigenous candidates who would be better at setting the agenda for the [email protected]last_img read more

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6 Steps to Create an Effective BYOD Plan Infographic

first_img With workplaces more mobile and interconnected than ever, many employees have the ability to work from home or on the go. While at first glance, having a bring your own device (BYOD) policy in your office can help with flexibility and cutting costs, it could also lead to security issues and major IT headaches if businesses aren’t too careful.So what can managers and IT departments do to ensure the safety of company data and productivity of their employees?  Well, actually a lot.Related: A Lack of Communication on Cyber Security Will Cost Your Business BigComputing and security company Bitglass recommends investing in strategy that lets employees choose whatever device they like, keeping in mind that while software and hardware are replaceable, company data is not. It’s important to remember that the plan shouldn’t create more fires for IT to put out or more steps that ultimately keep employees from being productive. Also, be sure that the plan allows for more hires and new devices so IT isn’t overloaded as the company expands.For more on connectivity, growth and keeping private and company data separate, check out Bitglass’ six-step infographic on creating a BYOD plan that is helpful to everyone. Click to Enlarge+ Related: Be Sure to Look Around the Office When Searching for Gaps in Your Data Security 2 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. August 21, 2014center_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now »last_img read more

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