June, 2021 Archive

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Ireland can be World Cup contenders – Paul Wallace

first_imgPaul O’Connell, Keith Earls, Donncha O’Callagahan and Rory BestEUREKA! Declan Kidney finally got the new high-tempo Irish game clicking at the final hurdle of the Six Nations.The ball-in-hand game failed to click against Italy and though it yielded three tries against France, the loss saw a regressive kicking game implemented for the ensuing games. Then, with the pressure of a Triple Crown and title gone, Ireland cut loose.There was talk about how important it was to stop England from winning a Grand Slam but that day is long gone. Now it’s all about performance and winning silverware for an ambitious Irish team. A win against England in the old days would be a season-saver but now it’s about how we let our own Slam get away with narrow losses to France and Wales. Yet, looking forward to the World Cup, the display against England was a huge springboard.The big question now is can Ireland play with that tempo and precision on a regular basis? I think that performance has got the attention of Australia and with Italy’s step forward the RWC group is far from a formality.The scrum, a weakness in the Irish game for some time, has emerged as a weapon. Mike Ross has been superb and provided strong right shoulders for fun. Cian Healy is growing into a dominant Test prop well ahead of his years. Rory Best has added power in the scrum and as a unit they’re becoming a grizzled front row.The lineout had creaked due largely to a lack of jumping options but it improved dramatically against Wales and England. Paul O’Connell was a huge factor as he improved game on game to finish like the player we recall from before his injury.His partner in crime, Donncha O’Callaghan, outplayed O’Connell and was the most consistent performer. His work-rate holding ball-carriers up in the tackle so as to gain an Irish scrum was vital to the new Irish defence.The news gets better. Sean O’Brien has settled in comfortably in what is the best Irish back row for some time. When Stephen Ferris is hardly missed, you know you’re playing well. This will surely be Kidney’s toughest decision come the World Cup. Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit DUBLIN, IRELAND – MARCH 19: Ireland players Paul O’ Connell (l) Keith Earles, Donncha O’ Callaghan and Rory Best sing the national anthem before the RBS 6 Nations match between Ireland and England at Aviva Stadium on March 19, 2011 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The other big question at fly-half was solved through Jonathan Sexton’s Man of the Match effort against England. As England have done with Flood and Wilkinson, Ireland look better suited to start with Sexton’s running game and finish with the game management of O’Gara.Elsewhere, Rob Kearney may force his way back in at full-back even though Keith Earls attacked so well against England – question marks remain over Earls’s catching and kicking game. At scrum-half, Eoin Reddan has been in sparkling form and will keep the jersey.Ireland can be confident in their ability to play a high-tempo, ball-in-hand game and will arrive in New Zealand as a real World Cup contender.This article appeared in the May 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UKlast_img read more

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Lions 2013: Quade Cooper, the man in the middle of the storm

first_imgIf Genia is a must for gladiatorial Lions duty, so is Cooper. The loss of injured players is a shame for the series; to not have a game-changer taking part because he was flighty and loose with his lips last time he left Australian camp seems criminal for the sake of the series.Perhaps that is selfish, but it is a time to be self-indulgent. We want entertainment, we want characters, we want a cheeky villain with gold dust in his boots. He wants to be there too, and he wants to prove a point. What is there to lose? Well, depending on the outcome tomorrow, Robbie Deans may lose a little face, if only so he can gain an in-form, hungry fly-half. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A lot is at stake for Cooper personally, too. Although he is heavily backed to win a place in the greater Australian squad when six extra places are filled next week, he cannot be certain of his inclusion and must put in a decent turn.Wise old heads: The Lions coaches will be wary of CooperThat is something the world’s audience also want. If we ignore the perpetual assertion that Will Genia – arguably the best scrum-half on the planet right now – is a better player when he is aiming his passes at Cooper, it must be pointed out that the stand-off is supremely talented. He could turn a game on a sixpence if given the chance.center_img The calm before the storm: Ewen McKenzie and Quade Cooper take a chair before the rush of playing the LionsBy Alan DymockHIS RUGBY may be bohemian and his reputation grandiose, but Quade Cooper is not the arrogant mess many believe him to be. His flaw is that he needs the spotlight in order to perform.Ever the performer: Flamboyant Cooper That can be as much help as it is a hindrance, but it guarantees entertainment from the fly-half. So when the Queensland Reds not only named a strong starting 15 to play against the Lions at the Suncorp Stadium on Saturday, but made Cooper their captain, they ensured that all eyes would be on the New Zealand-born playmaker. They have effectively plastered the make-up on him, fastened his tap shoes, poked him onto the stage and said: “dance.”The kid can move, though, and this is when he is at his most dangerous. Of course, the rugby player-turned-boxer has to play up to the role and can try too much or sometimes prods little kick over the top too soon, but if he is at his bombastic best or his play is patchy is irrelevant. He will be unpredictable and at the very worst will still starve the Lions of rhythm.Head coach Ewen McKenzie has taken an educated gamble by making Cooper his captain. He knows Cooper will try his best to dazzle and he will wreak some form of havoc or another. Win and the head coach underlines his credentials as a top operator. Lose and he has given the Lions his best shot –  even though he was expected to lose anyway –  and gained kudos for respecting the tourists in the process.last_img read more

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Players to Watch at the 2015 World Cup

first_imgVasil LobzhanidzeGEORGIAVasil Lobzhanidze could become the youngest RWC player ever this autumn as he’s still 18. The scrum-half played in five Tests in this year’s European Nations Cup and then helped Georgia U20 win the World Rugby Trophy for the first time. Even the coaches have been amazed at how well the teenager has performed, with Milton Haig saying: “He’s absolutely a star.” Dane ColesNEW ZEALANDHe only made the No 2 jersey his own last year but 28-year-old Dane Coles could still be wearing it come RWC 2019. The Hurricanes hooker has always been a dynamic player, as happy in wide spaces as the tight quarters, and having bulked up in recent seasons his scrummaging has improved too. Just as well given the tough packs in Pool C.Fetu’u VainikoloTONGAFetu’u Vainikolo will be familiar to UK audiences given his stints at Connacht and Exeter after leaving the Highlanders. At 30, he’s clearly not a new kid on the block, but with 14 tries in his first 22 Tests there is no doubting the winger’s attacking threat. Expect to see him in the thick of the action for Tonga before he joins up with Top 14 side Oyonnax post-World Cup.POOL DJohn MoonlightCANADAAs the best player in Canada’s sevens team, John Moonlight is sure to put his great engine to good use when playing in the back row at the World Cup. His speed, power and leadership skills will be even more crucial next July as Canada bid to secure a place at Rio 2016 by playing in the world repêchage sevens event. Boot man: Henry Slade offers England options with his kicking game. Photo: Getty Images LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Robbie HenshawIRELANDThe assurance shown by Robbie Henshaw in midfield means Brian O’Driscoll’s absence has not been keenly felt. The Connacht No 12 is watertight in defence, has safe hands in attack and game intelligence. Picking Conor Murray’s kick out of the skies to score against England will have been a highlight for him. With 31 men in each of the 20 World Cup squads, there are a total of 620 players taking part in this autumn’s tournament – that’s a lot of names! Rugby World has made things a little easier by picking ‘one to watch’ from each of the competing nations – there are rising stars, established figures and plenty of interesting tales. Check out who we’ve selected…POOL AWill SkeltonAUSTRALIAA giant of a man at 6ft 8in and 22st, Will Skelton is hard to stop when he builds up a head of steam. The 23-year-old lock has been working on his conditioning to prove he can use his bulk as effectively as a starter as he can from the bench, but even if he’s more of an impact player at this World Cup he’s sure to do some damage.Henry SladeENGLANDHenry Slade’s promise was clear to see throughout the 2014-15 season, and he was duly named Young Player of the Year at both the RPA and Aviva Premiership awards. The 22-year-old’s ability to play fly-half, centre and full-back makes him an ideal RWC squad member and he could be even more integral to the England team come 2019.Peceli YatoFIJIWith six tries in ten Top 14 games last season, Peceli Yato has a scoring record any winger would be proud of. As it happens, though, he plays in the back row for Clermont! The 22-year-old, who made his Test debut in July, has the power and size (6ft 5in and 16st 7lb) to break at least the first tackle. Big things are expected.Joaquin PradaURUGUAYJoaquin Prada has fast become the fashionable choice in Uruguay’s midfield. Playing 25 games since his Test debut in June 2013, the 24-year-old has built up plenty of Test experience at outside-centre and scored one of the tries in the crucial play-off win over Russia. The amateur’s gliding running style and ability to get on the outside of defenders could catch the eye during RWC 2015.Hallam AmosWALESAble to play anywhere in the back three, Hallam Amos has risen to prominence after a stellar season at the Dragons, making more metres (605) in the Challenge Cup than any other player and earning a WRU dual contract. The medical student, 20, is rated by the Wales bosses for his versatility, intelligence and line-breaking power.POOL BKenki FukuokaJAPANHe may not be quite as hyped as other Japanese wings but livewire 23-year-old Kenki Fukuoka is worth watching. Speedy and curious enough to come off his wing, he darted through for two scores with his first two touches in Test rugby. He has also beaten Wales and scored a brace against Scotland.Tim Nanai-WilliamsSAMOATim Nanai-Williams represented New Zealand at sevens level but last season used the loophole opened up by rugby’s inclusion in the Olympics to become eligible for Samoa, birthplace of his parents, by playing for the islanders on the HSBC Sevens World Series. While his slight frame isn’t going to frighten opponents, his footwork and running ability will.Finn RussellSCOTLANDIn a short space of time young Finn Russell has risen through the ranks to be the man who gets Scotland shifting, despite only a few seasons as a full-time pro. Blessed with an array of kicking talents and a willingness to run when space opens up, Russell has the swagger you want in a young fly-half.Jesse KrielSOUTH AFRICAHaving played most of his rugby at full-back, Jesse Kriel was thrust into the outside-centre berth by South Africa this summer and handled the switch with aplomb. The 21-year-old, whose twin brother also plays for the Bulls, beat three defenders to score on his Test debut against Australia. Heyneke Meyer says: “I think he can become one of the greats and he is one of the most talented players I’ve ever coached.”AJ MacGintyUSAA product of Blackrock College in Dublin, AJ MacGinty headed to the US after university on a one-year visa but ended up staying when he started working as a coach. He caught the eye for his playing ability too – Mike Tolkin describes him as “really sharp” – and having qualified on residency the fly-half made his Eagles debut this year. Expect to see him in the No 10 shirt during the World Cup.POOL CTomás LavaniniARGENTINATomás Lavanini is an enormous lock who is not only comfortable at Test level but also made himself an automatic pick for Racing as they hunted the Top 14 play-offs. At 22 he’s not well known yet, but is part of a new generation of Pumas who will redefine the team once a few older dogs call it a day post-2015. Russel van WykNAMIBIAA newcomer to Test rugby, Russel van Wyk made his debut on the wing against Spain in June and was Man of the Match in the first game of the Russia series the following month after scoring a brace of tries. The 25-year-old, who has also represented Namibia in athletics, has been praised by Phil Davies for his “world-class pace”.center_img Yoann HugetFRANCEThere is a strong argument to suggest he shouldn’t be at the World Cup after a vicious stamp against Bordeaux, but there’s no doubting Yoann Huget is one of France’s most dangerous players. At 6ft 3in and nearly 16st, the Toulouse wing is difficult to stop from close range, but he also has the pace to glide or step outside a man. He could wreak havoc. Sabin Stratila may be second-choice full-back behind Catalin Fercu but he has the skills to be wearing Romania’s No 15 shirt when the 2019 World Cup kicks off. He’s come through the age groups, played sevens and won his first cap against Germany in March, although he needs to play overseas if he’s to reach his full potential. For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Sabin StratilaROMANIA Michele CampagnaroITALYMichele Campagnaro has been quiet since he burst onto the scene in the Six Nations a few seasons back – being injured will do that for you. But the 22-year-old centre has no problem with pinning his ears back and having a go, and in his first World Cup he could catch us on our back heels. Exeter fans will enjoy watching their new signing. What players should you look out for during the 2015 World Cup? Rugby World selects a player from each of the 20 teamslast_img read more

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The making of Ireland wing James Lowe

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The making of Ireland wing James LoweBack in 2017, James Lowe talked to Rugby World about being diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis when he was 14. The Kiwi teenager went from being extremely active to “pretty much bedridden when I was at my worst”.Finding the right medication allowed him to not only play sport again but go on to have a career as a professional rugby player. And the Autumn Nations Cup marked the start of his international career with Ireland.He qualified on residency last November, having left New Zealand’s Chiefs to join Leinster in 2017, and marked his first Test against Wales with a try. Now he will be hoping to add to his scoring tally as part of Ireland’s Six Nations squad. Test call: Ireland’s James Lowe during the Autumn Nations Cup (Getty Images) Here we talk to those who have known Lowe, now 28, at different points in his life to discover more about him and his rugby journey…THE TEACHERPeter Grigg taught Lowe PE at Nelson College and also coached him in the school’s first XV from 2008 to 2010“It was obvious he had talent as he was first in the team as a young fella. Boys don’t normally spend three years in the first XV, so you could see straightaway there was a lot of potential there. He was a very good athlete – he played basketball and cricket as well and also did athletics – and you could see he was a talented young man. His pace, strength, power off the mark and ability to read the game stood out.School days: Lowe (15) in action for Nelson College (Nelson College)“The first year I coached him, in 2008, he missed a lot of the season (after being diagnosed with juvenile arthritis). That was a tough year for him, but the character of the young man means I wasn’t surprised that he was able to overcome adversity. He’s a winner.“He played a bit at centre for us but mainly full-back. In a quadrangular tournament up in Whanganui in 2010, I recall him receiving a kick at full-back with the other 29 players in front of him and going through everyone pretty much untouched to score a try. Outstanding.“In school, he was very friendly, well respected by his peers and a great kid. He was well known for breaking the school rules on wearing socks with sandals but he always got away with that, teachers never pulled him up on it!“He’s a loyal Nelson College man. He always pops in and has a word with the first XV boys, watches games. He’s very supportive to the school. Nelson College has had a lot of All Blacks and one other Irish international, Jared Payne.”THE MENTORAfter coaching Lowe at Nelson College, Andrew Goodman played alongside him at Tasman Mako in the early 2010s“I had James in the U14s team in my first year coaching at Nelson College, then coached him at first XV level a bit. He had an amazing skill-set, size and speed, from a young age. He had lots of energy and has been like that ever since I’ve known him. He’d always come to training with a smile on his face.“It was tough for him being so active and then being limited in what he could do at the stage he was diagnosed with arthritis. To his credit he came back and worked really hard to get back his size and conditioning that he’d lost.“Later I played against him in the local club competition – him for Waimea Old Boys, me for Nelson RFC. I remember him scoring a try against us at Trafalgar Park and getting pretty boisterous!Action man: James Lowe breaks for Tasman Makos (Getty Images)“We were in the same group at Tasman for a couple of seasons before I went to Leinster, then I came back in a coaching role at Tasman and he was in that group as well. He turned up every day to get better. We had guys from outside the region who could see the passion he had for the jersey and what it meant to him to play for the jersey, so there was a lot of respect for him. He still keeps a close eye on Tasman now.“When he signed for Leinster I got in contact with him to say what an amazing club it is and what an amazing place Dublin is, how good the set-up is there. I knew he’d go over and thrive. He brings something different with the way he plays and his ability to beat defenders.“He deserves to be on the international stage and it’s awesome to see him go on to the next level.” This article originally appeared in the December 2020 edition 0f Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. THE COACHTom Coventry was part of the coaching set-up at the Chiefs, where Lowe spent four years before joining Leinster“I watched James play as a schoolboy. He played on the left wing and had this massive left foot so could do long raking punts out of the 22. We (Chiefs coaches) watched him play for Tasman, where he was on one wing and Bryce Heem was on the other.“We had conversations with the coaches, Kieran Keane and Leon MacDonald, about the two wings and they both gave different answers – Leon in favour of James and Kieran for Bryce – so they both ended up at the Chiefs!“James really caught the eye on the left edge of the field; he was pretty exciting with ball in hand, had a great sidestep and nice shimmy, stayed well away from the touchline and managed to link up with inside support really well.“We had a really positive mindset of attacking out of our own half; James was a big part of that, he fitted into that well. It was quite unusual for us to exit out of our own half as our policy was to look to counter-attack first, but if nothing was on we’d rely on James to use his foot to kick us out of trouble. He could kick or beat people with his footwork.In the clear: James Lowe leads a Chiefs attack (Getty Images)“The try I remember was against the Crusaders in Christchurch (in 2014). It was a close game and he played on the right wing that day. He intercepted the ball on the 22 and ran 60-70 metres down the touchline to score in the corner and put the game out of reach. That was one of his early games for us and I remember cheering him home.“We based a lot of our recruitment on putting people in the team who added value not just as a rugby player but as a person. He was a pretty confident, chirpy member of the team. He had a gregarious attitude and personality that’s easy to get along with. A good character and good fun.“He used to share a flat with Matt Symons and the landlord once told them they had to mow the lawn, so my uncle went to cut the grass for them. I remember him coming back and saying, ‘It was like a jungle’. The grass was about a metre high – they’d never mown it since they’d been there!“We would have liked to have kept him at the Chiefs but there’s something that draws young Kiwi boys to the northern hemisphere; the salaries you can earn are a big part of it but it’s also just the overseas experience. Some guys go later in their career after seeing if they can make the All Blacks; James chose to go early. He was in the frame, I’m not saying he was guaranteed to make the All Blacks but he was playing good footy. We all wished him well when he left and it has certainly worked out for him.”THE CAPTAINIreland fly-half Johnny Sexton has played alongside, and captained, Lowe at Leinster for the past three years“I’d watched a lot of Super Rugby and seen him for the Chiefs, then when you know you’re signing someone it’s like player cam: rather than watch the game, you look for the guy you’ve signed.“I thought he was a very impressive player then and he’s been even more impressive since he got here. The energy he brings and his enthusiasm for the game is infectious. He’s been a big part of the success at Leinster.“Sometimes when you sign players from overseas it can be hard to get a really good player and a really good person at the same time, and it’s arguably more important to bring in the right person who may be a lesser player. We’re very lucky as he’s brilliant in the environment and a brilliant player.“He came from a strong environment with the Chiefs and that’s good for us as we’re able to ask him what he would do with the Chiefs, from a cultural point of view or a rugby point of view. Leinster are getting that intellectual property.“There are the strengths everyone sees – he’s a very good finisher, a very good ball-carrier. People might not see his work-rate off the ball, his energy, his communication. He’ll run in from the side of the pitch to congratulate the props on a good scrum or winning a penalty and is one of those guys who gives you great snippets of information.“He’s very popular and is able to hang around with the young guys as well as the old guys, as opposed to me who is firmly in the old brigade. If I tried to talk to the academy guys, they’d be thinking, ‘I have nothing in common with this guy’! James brings the younger and older groups together. He treats everyone the same and that’s what we try to do at Leinster and with Ireland now under Andy Farrell. Everyone gets a voice.“He is passionate about Leinster and he won’t take it (getting capped by Ireland) lightly, he realises the privilege afforded and will definitely make the most of it.“He takes rugby seriously but it’s not the be-all and end-all and he lets that shine through. I could learn from him on that!” Coaches and team-mates past and present tell us about the Leinster winger’s route to Test rugbylast_img read more

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Canada: Anglican Covenant decision in 2016

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Canada Joint Assembly, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Journal] The Anglican Church of Canada’s triennial General Synod on July 5 approved a motion that urges its faithful to continue conversations on the proposed Anglican Covenant and delays a final decision on whether to accept or reject it until 2016.The Covenant is a set of principles prescribed as a way of healing relationships among member provinces of the Anglican Communion, which have been damaged by divisions over human sexuality. It was recommended in the 2004 Windsor Report, written by a group of bishops, priests and theologians appointed by then- Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams.“At this time, there is no clear consensus within our church on whether to accept or reject the Covenant,” said the new prolocutor, Archdeacon Harry Huskins,  who presented the resolution on behalf of the governance working group (GWG). He added that the motion “allows us to hold our place at the table of Communion discussions.”The motion was met with mixed reactions on the floor.The Rev. Malcolm French, diocese of Qu’Appelle, argued that “there’s more consensus than one might believe.” French, moderator of the No Anglican Covenant Coalition, likened the Covenant to demanding “a pre-nuptial agreement when you’re already married.”Archdeacon Edward Simonton, diocese of Quebec, wondered, “Is this not a motion that is basically a very Canadian, polite way of saying no?” He added: “It seems like a good way to hedge our bets, one way or the other…”Canon Gene Packwood, diocese of Calgary, expressed concern about the “standing” of the Canadian church in other parts of the world.Others argued, however, that the church’s relationships with other members of the Communion are not only being healed but are flourishing through the bishops’ dialogue with their counterparts from Africa, companion relationships between dioceses in Canada and overseas, and through partnerships.The approved motion asks the Anglican Communion Working Group (ACWG) to “monitor continued developments” around the proposed Covenant. It requests that the ACWG render a report to the spring 2016 meeting of CoGS, and directs CoGS  “to bring a recommendation regarding the adoption of the Covenant” to the next General Synod in 2016.In 2010, General Synod had approved a resolution that received the final text of the Covenant, requested the ACWG to prepare study and consultation materials for parishes and dioceses, and requested that the faith, worship and ministry committee and the governance working group provide advice on the “theological, ecclesiological, legal and constitutional implications of the decision to adopt or not adopt the Covenant.” It also directed CoGS “to bring a recommendation regarding the adoption of the Covenant” to the 2013 General Synod. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Canada: Anglican Covenant decision in 2016 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Anglican Covenant, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ecumenical & Interreligious Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL By Marites N. SisonPosted Jul 8, 2013 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

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TREC emite una carta a la Iglesia Episcopal

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Posted Dec 16, 2013 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books [Oficina de Relaciones Públicas] El grupo de trabajo para la re-imaginación de la Iglesia Episcopal (TREC) ha emitido una carta a la Iglesia Episcopal.La carta de TREC para la Iglesia: 10 de diciembre del 2013En los últimos meses, los miembros del Grupo de Trabajo para la Re-imaginación de la Iglesia Episcopal han estado en un peregrinar de escucha – en persona y de manera virtual. Hemos hablado con grupos de jóvenes y obispos, el Consejo Ejecutivo y consejos de líderes locales, en las provincias, en las diócesis, parroquias y comunidades religiosas. Hemos preguntado a la gente cuáles son sus esperanzas y sueños son para con nuestra Iglesia, ¿Qué aspectos de la Iglesia esperan que apreciemos y fortalezcamos, y  en que desean que fuéramos ser lo suficientemente valientes como para dejar de lado con el fin de hacer a nuestra Iglesia más vibrante y centrada en la misión.Nuestra escucha a la Iglesia es un proceso continuo. Lo que hemos oído es un profundo y permanente amor por nuestra Iglesia y su manera única de crear comunidad y misión centrada en Cristo. El Libro de Oración Común y la belleza y el misterio de nuestra liturgia nos unen a través de las edades, geografías y políticas. Nosotros amamos profundamente lo intelectual, así como también la vida espiritual que es cultivada en nuestros miembros (“usted no necesita dejar su mente en la puerta”).En muchos otros temas, no estamos de acuerdo. Escuchamos llamados para que la Iglesia sea “menos reactivas a los problemas sociales”, y también llamados para hacer que la  voz de la Iglesia sobre temas sociales sea aún más fuerte. Escuchamos llamados para una mayor diversidad en nuestra liturgia y la música, y llamados igualmente urgentes por menos diversidad. ¡Nos esperábamos nada diferente! Muchos de nosotros apreciamos la diversidad de nuestra comunidad tanto como apreciamos las creencias y tradiciones comunes que nos unen.Pero hubo varios temas fuertes y urgentes que surgían consistentemente a través de nuestras discusiones: la Iglesia nos pide que reduzcamos la burocracia y la intensidad de los  recursos en nuestros procesos de toda la iglesia. La Iglesia quiere que el trabajo de la Convención General y otras estructuras de la Iglesia sea más relevante y más vivificante para nuestras comunidades parroquiales locales. Y, la Iglesia quiere que enfrentemos y lidiemos con los temas difíciles y los “elefantes en el centro de la habitación” que absorben nuestros recursos, tiempo y energía, y que bloquean nuestro crecimiento.Como grupo de trabajo, hemos estado reflexionando sobre lo que hemos oído, y la visión de una Iglesia Episcopal revigorizada está emergiendo.Una nueva visiónImagina un mundo en el que todas nuestras parroquias episcopales son espiritualmente vibrantes y están enfocadas en la misión. Una encuesta reciente indica que menos del 30 % pasaría esta prueba hoy. [1] Imagine un mundo en el que nuestras parroquias consistentemente son buenas para inspirar a sus miembros tradicionales y también están energizadas y son eficaces en alcanzar a las nuevas generaciones y las nuevas poblaciones. Imagina un mundo donde la forma de nuestra Iglesia se adapta con frecuencia, en la medida que nuevas comunidades parroquiales surgen en lugares no tradicionales y en formas no tradicionales, y en la medida que parroquias existentes se fusionan y se reinventan al cambiar las condiciones locales. Imagina un mundo en el que clero episcopal y líderes laicos son reconocidos por ser líderes altamente eficaces, hábiles en la formación cristiana y la construcción de comunidades, en la nueva plantación de iglesias, en la transformación de iglesias, y en la organización de comunidades para la misión.  Imagina que los episcopales colaboran fácilmente entre sí a través de la Iglesia: formando comunidades de interés, trabajando juntos para compartir los aprendizajes de las iniciativas locales y la colaboración para aunar recursos e ideas. Imagina que la amplia estructura de la Iglesia Episcopal sirve principalmente para permitir y ampliar la misión local a través de la colaboración en redes, así como también a prestar su voz profética. Imagine que cada trienio nos reunimos en un ” Convocatoria General de Misión “, donde participantes de toda la Iglesia se sumergen en el aprendizaje de la misión, en compartir, en la toma de decisiones y la celebración.Realizar esta visiónTomará mucho más que cambios estructurales para concretizar este nuevo mundo. Tomará un liderazgo resuelto y capaz en todos los niveles de la Iglesia, y se necesitará un cambio cultural amplio y profundo dentro de la Iglesia. Vamos a tener que trabajar a través de un proceso de duelo, ya que, individual y colectivamente perdemos estructuras que han sido partes esenciales de nuestra vida e incluso de nuestras identidades. Al mismo tiempo, también vamos a tener que encontrar una manera de adoptar una nueva y más esperanzador mentalidad: tendremos que creer, verdaderamente creen-que ¡a Iglesia Episcopal puede, debe y tiene que CRECER!En nuestro trabajo, vamos a señalar algunos de los cambios no estructurales que creemos que serán fundamental para vivir en una nueva visión de una Iglesia vibrante, creciente y adaptativa. Vamos a dar algunas sugerencias sobre cómo podemos ir más allá de las reformas estructurales para lograr estos cambios en los comportamientos de liderazgo, cultura y capacidad organizacional. Nos vamos a centrar la mayor parte de nuestro tiempo como grupo de trabajo en el desarrollo de un conjunto de recomendaciones para los cambios estructurales o cambios “técnicos” que creemos que será una parte crítica de revigorizar a la Iglesia. Estos cambios jugaran tres papeles importantes en la revitalización de nuestra Iglesia:1)  Estos “despejaran el camino” para la innovación y la adaptación, liberando nuestro tiempo y energía, y acelerando la toma de decisiones.2) Ellos le darán el liderazgo de la Iglesia una agenda audaz y holística de cambio que, si se aprueba, servirá como modelo a seguir del tipo de cambios audaces similares que deben ocurrir en todos los otros niveles de la Iglesia.3) Estos reinventaran el papel de las organizaciones y estructuras de la Iglesia en general: alejándonos de “hacer” misión hacia el  capacitar para la misión, alejándonos de establecer agendas y asignar recursos hacia la conexión de las comunidades locales e individuos para el aprendizaje mutuo, el apoyo y la colaboración.¿Qué  se puede esperar de nosotros?Hemos identificado una serie de cuestiones clave que creemos que debe ser abordada a través de la reforma estructural. Estamos trabajando para desarrollar propuestas que abordan cada uno de estos temas. Algunas de estas propuestas se sentirá incrementales, y muchas han sido debatido antes. Algunas de ellas se percibirán como audaces y arriesgadas. Algunas de ellas van más allá del alcance de una interpretación estricta de la resolución que creó nuestro Grupo de trabajo (C095). Algunas de ellas van más allá del alcance de la autoridad de la Convención General, y por lo tanto va a tomar la forma de “recomendaciones” o “proclamaciones proféticas”, en lugar de las propuestas legislativas. En conjunto, sin embargo, junto con las muchas cosas emocionantes, vibrantes, y esperanzadoras ya emergentes en torno a la Iglesia, creemos que nuestras propuestas serán parte de la constante labor que se realiza en el dirigir a la Iglesia en un nuevo camino hacia la salud y la vitalidad.Algunas de las áreas en las que estamos desarrollando recomendaciones incluyen:1) El papel y la mecánica de la Convención General: La reducción de la agenda legislativa y reducir el tamaño de sus órganos legislativos, mientras que ampliar el alcance de nuestras reuniones a fin de que no sólo sirvan como espacios donde la legislaciones importantes sean debatidas y aprobadas, sino también como un espacio vibrante, abierto e inclusivo de convocatorias celebrativas de la  misión – reuniendo a participantes apasionados y activos en cada tipo de misión que está sucediendo alrededor de la iglesia.2) Las funciones y responsabilidades de los Oficiales Presidentes  y del Consejo Ejecutivo – en particular en relación con todo el personal de la Iglesia: El establecimiento de líneas simples y claras de rendición de cuentas y responsabilidad, reduciendo la redundancia, aclarando confusiones que pueden inhibir los procesos claros de toma de decisión y cambiar el tamaño del Consejo para que funcione más efectivamente como una junta de gobierno.3) La amplitud de la CCAB (Comités, Comisiones, Agencias y Juntas) y la creación de modelos alternativos, frescos y creativos para la colaboración en toda la Iglesia: La refundición de la mayoría de nuestros CCABs en un nuevo modelo de colaboración distributiva y responsable. La creación de modelos de colaboración en línea que conectan líderes misioneros locales de toda nuestra Iglesia para que nuestra “agenda” colectiva puede adaptarse dinámicamente a las necesidades locales y para que nos conectamos con el mayor activo de nuestra Iglesia- todos nosotros, sentados en los bancos haciendo un gran trabajo a nivel local, pero mayormente desconectados unos de los otros y de la Iglesia Episcopal.4) Número de diócesis: Considerando un proceso objetivo, de una sola vez,  para el establecimiento de normas para un tamaño y estructura diocesana saludable y viable con el fin de permitir a la misión y reducir la complejidad de nuestra organización.5) Capacidad y desarrollo de liderazgo: El establecimiento de formación de liderazgo efectiva y el desarrollo de enfoques para todas las órdenes del ministerio, basadas en nuestros votos del bautismo y la ordenación, así como en las necesidades particulares del siglo 21. Señalar en voz alta las implicaciones para las carreras del clero y la empleomanía, así como también  las implicaciones y oportunidades para los seminarios y otros programas de desarrollo de liderazgo actuales. Fomentar la creación de nuevos “centros de excelencia” u otros mecanismos para fomentar el aprendizaje constante y la creación de capacidad a gran escala, fomentando la creación de redes en torno a nodos existentes de trabajo excelente.También está claro que hay una necesidad profunda de desarrollar algunos entendimientos comunes sobre cómo diócesis pueden tomar mejores decisiones acerca de, y proporcionar el mejor apoyo para, la vitalidad y viabilidad de las parroquias. Dado que el paisaje cultural y demográfico es ampliamente diferente desde que la mayoría de nuestras congregaciones se fundaron y sus edificios fueron construidos, ¿cómo podemos hacer el uso más fiel y estratégico de nuestros recursos cuando tomamos decisiones sobre el número de parroquias, lugares, consolidaciones, nuevo plantas, etc.? Este trabajo es en gran parte en manos de las diócesis locales más que la Convención General, pero esperamos que nuestro trabajo tendrá algunas reflexiones y recomendaciones que pueden ser absorbidos por toda la iglesia en torno a estas cuestiones apremiantes, así como también críticas.Lo que necesitamos de ti¡Tenemos un enorme y complejo alcance de trabajo, y necesitamos tu ayuda! Por favor, continúa hablando con nosotros y dándonos comentarios e ideas. ¡Si no has convocado a una discusión con nuestro paquete de compromiso, o completado nuestro cuestionario en línea, por favor hazlo! Si tienes reacciones sobre nuestro documento de Identidad Episcopal Identidad y Visión publicado en nuestra página web, por favor envíanos tus comentarios e ideas. Estamos revisándolo con los comentarios que ya hemos recibido y seguiremos revisándolo al colectar comentarios adicionales. Por favor envíanos tus comentarios e ideas respecto a esta carta.En el futuro, por favor,  este atento de ver los borradores de recomendaciones en torno a las áreas de reforma que hemos destacado en esta nota. Publicaremos porciones en torno a nuestras ideas tan rápido como podamos, a partir de finales de enero de 2014, para permitir la mayor discusión, el debate y la retroalimentación cuanto sea posible. Vamos a seguir publicando actualizaciones de nuestras propuestas en evolución en el transcurso del año, a medida que trabajamos hacia la finalización de nuestro trabajo a finales de 2014. Además, estamos en el proceso de planificación de una reunión especial de la Iglesia en el otoño de 2014 para discutir más a fondo nuestras propuestas y recibir retroalimentación. En línea con nuestra visión de vivir en nuevas maneras de ” hacer Iglesia” en el siglo 21, esta reunión será virtual, de modo que podamos involucrar a un grupo lo más amplio y diverso posible, sin restringir el acceso a aquellos que no tienen los recursos financieros para unirse a una reunión en persona.Por último, por favor, oren por nosotros y por todos los que están participando con nosotros, ya que hacemos lo mejor que podemos para discernir el camino correcto para nuestra Iglesia. Puede  utilizar la oración que miembros de nuestro Grupo de Trabajo han escrito para nosotros:Espíritu Santo, que te ciernes sobre el mundo, llena los corazones y las mentes de tus siervos en  El Grupo de Trabajo para la Re-Imaginación de La Iglesia Episcopal con sabiduría, claridad y valentía. Trabaja en ellos, al examinar y recomendar reformas para la estructura, gobierno y administración de esta rama de la Iglesia una, santa, católica y apostólica. Ayúdalos a proponer reformas para proclamar de manera más eficaz mediante la palabra y el ejemplo las Buenas Nuevas de Dios en Cristo, para desafiar al mundo para buscar y servir a Cristo en todas las personas – amando a nuestro prójimo como a nosotros mismos y ser una luz ardiente por el tipo de justicia y paz que lleva a todas las personas, a respetar la dignidad de cada ser humano. Se con la Iglesia Episcopal para que todos podamos estar abiertos a los desafíos que este grupo de trabajo traerá a nosotros,-  y ayuda a toda la Iglesia a discernir tu voluntad para nuestro futuro. En el nombre de Jesucristo, nuestro Mediador, en cuya vida se fundó esta Iglesia. AMENGracias por la confianza que han depositado en nosotros, y por la retroalimentación que ya han proporcionado. Gracias de antemano por los comentarios y el debate vigoroso que esperamos que marcarán la próxima fase de nuestro trabajo con usted.Para más información, preguntas o comentarios, póngase en contacto con los miembros de TREC en [email protected][1] David Roozen, “Una década de cambio en las Congregaciones de América: 2000-2010”, Instituto Hartford para la Investigación Religiosa, 2011.Paquete de Participación de TREC:  http://reimaginetec.org/ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Structure, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY TREC emite una carta a la Iglesia Episcopal Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

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Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby’s pain at broken communion

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Featured Events Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby’s pain at broken communion Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Archbishop of Canterbury TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion, Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Posted Oct 30, 2017 Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN [Anglican Communion News Service] The archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, has spoken of the pain caused by the broken communion between Christians brought about as a result of the Protestant Reformation. But, as the churches mark tomorrow’s 500th anniversary of Martin Luther nailing his theses to the door of the Schlosskirche (All Saints/Castle Church) in Wittenberg, Welby said that “we have learned once again to love one another — and to seek to bless and love the world in which we live.”Read the entire article here. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

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Church of England awards major grants to spread Christian faith…

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Church of England awards major grants to spread Christian faith in towns and cities Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Church of England] A funding package worth £24 million (US$29.7 million) has been announced by the Church of England to help spread the Christian message in urban and deprived areas.Awards have been made by the Archbishops’ Council to fund mission and evangelism in towns and cities alongside social action projects, from support for new parents to community cafes and food banks.In the North East, £4 million (US$4.94 million) has been awarded for mission and evangelism in South Tyneside, Sunderland, Hartlepool, Easington and Stockton-on-Tees areas with plans to lease empty high street shops in some towns.The shops will host ‘Communities of Hope’, centers where people can explore the Christian faith. The centers will include social projects from food banks to community cafes, budget cookery classes and help with job hunting including CV writing and literacy and numeracy support.In Manchester and Rochdale, £5 million (US$6.18 million) has been awarded for projects to develop new church communities, including a revamp of the Ascension Church in Hulme to include a venue for music and arts activities such as gospel choirs.The Rochdale and Manchester projects are located in some of the most deprived communities in the country and will provide a range of social action including support for parents and children and volunteer programs working in areas such as dependency on drugs and alcohol, and street outreach for homeless people.In Birmingham, a grant is to be shared for mission and evangelism work by St. Mary’s Church Pype Hayes in the Aston and Sutton Coldfield areas and a planned new church in Shirley. Services such as a food bank and a youth drop-in would be provided at St Mary’s and a community café and support for first time parents in Shirley.In Liverpool Diocese, £4.61 million (US$5.7 million) has been awarded to develop mission to 11-29 year olds in Liverpool and Wigan.In Newham, east London, £3 million (US$3.71 million) has been awarded to expand mission work in West Ham and other areas of the borough for new congregations and centers of evangelism. The funding would include work on projects to tackle issues such as homelessness, hunger and drug abuse.A £1.37 million (US$1.69 million) grant will be used to help support the development of more than 140 lay people to act as community evangelists in Middlesbrough, Hull, Scarborough, Redcar & Cleveland and Bridlington.There will also be funding to invest in mission and evangelism in Milton Keynes, High Wycombe, Reading, Slough, Southampton and Bournemouth.The Strategic Development Funding (SDF) grants have been awarded as part of the Church of England’s program of Renewal and Reform, aimed at ensuring that the Church of England once more becomes a growing church for all people in all areas of the country.The awards have been announced as many areas of the country – particularly the most deprived communities – cope with the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.Debbie Clinton, Director of Renewal and Reform for the Church of England, said: “The range of work outlined in these projects is a measure of the Church of England’s commitment to all areas of the country – including some of the most deprived urban communities.  Our churches are sharing the love of Jesus Christ and bringing the good news of the gospel through spiritual and pastoral support to people as well as practical action.”Full story available here. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Anglican Communion Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Posted Jul 8, 2020 last_img read more

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Help the Apopka Community by test-driving a new Ford

first_img TAGSApopka Rotary ClubDrive 4 UR CommunityLoaves & FishesMullinax Ford Previous articleBlue Darters Land in AP Week 2 PollNext articleCity Council Takes First Step in Piedmont Plaza redevelopment Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Mullinax Ford partners with Loaves & Fishes and Apopka RotaryAn exciting test-drive fundraising event will generate much-needed money for Loaves and Fishes’ efforts in helping support the local community and Rotary of Apopka that works to make lasting improvements in our community.Drive 4 UR Community was designed to help raise much needed funding for local community groups and nonprofit organizations.Mullinax is bringing Ford Motor Company’s Drive 4 UR Community program to the Apopka community in an effort to raise up to $6,000 for Loaves and Fishes and Rotary of Apopka. For every person who takes the wheel and test-drives a new vehicle at Mullinax Ford on October 6th, Ford Motor Company will donate $20 to Loaves and Fishes or Rotary of Apopka, respectively. The funds will prove to be beneficial to the groups’ missions!“We know funding for community programs is hard to come by, and we want to do our part to help make sure these programs remain available,” said Jerry Mullinax, owner at Mullinax Ford. “We’re excited to raise money for the Apopka Community.”The event, which will be held from 3:30 PM to 7:30 PM, will feature many vehicles from Ford’s line-up.Whether you are looking to test out fuel efficiency vehicles, like the Focus, or want to try out technology features like Active Park Assist in the Escape, Mullinax Fird  will be able to put you behind the wheel of your favorite Ford vehicle. Dealership staff on site will be able to assist with all vehicles and provide additional information about each vehicle available for test-drive.To participate in this exciting event and get behind the wheel of your favorite Ford vehicle, please visit Mullinax Ford Apopka (1551 E. Semoran Blvd) between 3:30 PM and 7:30 PM on October 6th.Participants must be 18 or older and have a valid driver’s license. There is a limit of one test-drive per household. All test-drives will last approximately 7-10 minutes, to participants’ discretion.Use this link to learn more. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 last_img read more

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Breaking traffic news: I-75 could close

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here On Maine Street coming from the Apopka High School parking lot right past Red Cedar St. on the west side of Maine heading south there is an entire roof sitting on the ground among peoples’ houses. I can’t figure out where the house or building is that it belongs on, but it is sitting there all intact. That took some force to lift that thing up and put it back down. The mystery is where is the building that it came from? Mama Mia Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSFlorida Highway PatrolI-75 Previous articleLake Apopka Wildlife Drive remains closedNext articleApopka’s game at Dr. Phillips on Friday canceled Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Floridians that are traveling should avoid the area if possibleTraffic AlertFrom the Florida Highway PatrolThe Santa Fe River under I-75 has rapidly risen 15 feet within the past 36 hours due to the heavy rainfall over North Florida from Hurricane Irma.Additional bridges that may be impacted include:U.S. 27, U.S. 41, S.R. 47 and possibly U.S. 121. Additional maps and detour information will be forthcoming.FDOT and DHSMV have staff monitoring the bridges that may be impacted by the flooding 24/7.If the river rises to an unsafe level, the bridge will be impassable both northbound and southbound and would be closed immediately. Floridians that are traveling should avoid the area if possible. If required to be in the area, the Florida Department of Transportation is actively working with WAZE, Google Maps, the Georgia Department of Transportation and other transportation industry partners to communicate the potential reroutes to the public. Floridians should consult www.FL511.com for up-to-date information on road closures and travel routes. Please enter your name here September 13, 2017 at 12:10 pm Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Just think how it was earlier in the year, dry as a bone, no rain, and a severe drought. Now there has been heavy rainfall and flooding, so you know what that means: sinkholes! It always happens after a drought then when the rains fall heavily. Reply September 13, 2017 at 12:18 pm We got some gas this morning without much hassle. We are still hanging by a thread, the tall palm tree hanging over our street light power lines over our driveway, that is the only thing keeping the uprooted tree from falling on down. If it did, at least we could chainsaw it, but not while entangled in the power lines. My cat is having fun running up and down the tree now, at least, using it to sharpen his claws. No Duke Energy truck has came around and I have reported it twice. Mama Miacenter_img Please enter your comment! Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Trump is coming to Florida tomorrow to see the damage…….who cares, I don’t. Probably just trying to sell his golf hats anyway…….this whole hurricane thing has been depressing, if you ask me, and we are a lot better off than most here in Florida. The people flooded out, I feel sorry for, that is terrible. No power, no cell phone service, no food, no water, no jobs, their vehicles flooded out and ruined, OMG, South Florida people, and some others, are having it so bad. Extremely depressing, how do they cope? I, for one, get depressed very easily. I watch the teenagers and young kids having fun playing in the flood waters, and laughing, and not a care in the world. I used to be like that myself. I only wish I could be that way now, but I can’t. Just like the lines waiting before the hurricane to get generators, the younger people were hob-nobbing and socializing, and having a blast……not the same for me anymore. I admire that they are positive, and that way, just wish I was like that still, but I am not. UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 September 13, 2017 at 12:33 pm September 13, 2017 at 12:53 pm Mama Mia Reply 4 COMMENTS LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Reply Mama Mia Reply last_img read more

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