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Belle Mare Holding Ltd (BMHL.mu) HY2012 Interim Report

first_imgBelle Mare Holding Ltd (BMHL.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Tourism sector has released it’s 2012 interim results for the half year.For more information about Belle Mare Holding Ltd (BMHL.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Belle Mare Holding Ltd (BMHL.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Belle Mare Holding Ltd (BMHL.mu)  2012 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileBelle Mare Holding Limited is a Mauritian investment company that engages in the commercial and property sectors. The company invests in ventures such as hotels and leisure, banks and insurance firms, as well as agriculture and exports. Belle Mare Holding Limited is headquartered in Port Louis, Mauritius. Belle Mare Holding Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius.last_img read more

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Arbico Plc (ARBICO.ng) 2019 Annual Report

first_imgArbico Plc (ARBICO.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2019 annual report.For more information about Arbico Plc (ARBICO.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Arbico Plc (ARBICO.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Arbico Plc (ARBICO.ng)  2019 annual report.Company ProfileArbico Plc is a leading construction and civil engineering company in Nigeria responsible for building major residential, commercial, industrial and hospitality projects as well as key infrastructure projects. The company offers services such as pre-construction and estimating, design, build and project management as well as engineering, procurement and construction management services. Arbico Plc has been involved in the construction of major projects in Nigeria spanning residential, commercial, industrial and hospitality projects as well as a number of key infrastructure projects for the government of Nigeria. Flagship projects include residential projects such as No 7 Oniru in Lagos, Oba Elgushi residence in Lagos and SKA residence in Lagos; public assembly projects such as the Rose of Sharon Centre in Lagos; commercial projects such as Feyide House in Lagos and KAAF Building in Ogun State; hospitality projects such as Park Inn Hotel in Ogun State; industrial projects such as the Coleman Factory Development in Ogun State; and infrastructure projects such as NBC Asejire Plant in Oyo and the effluent/water treatment plant in Ogun State. Arbico Plc was founded in 1958 and is a subsidiary of R28 Limited. The company’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Arbico Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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The making of Ireland wing James Lowe

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The making of Ireland wing James LoweBack in 2017, James Lowe talked to Rugby World about being diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis when he was 14. The Kiwi teenager went from being extremely active to “pretty much bedridden when I was at my worst”.Finding the right medication allowed him to not only play sport again but go on to have a career as a professional rugby player. And the Autumn Nations Cup marked the start of his international career with Ireland.He qualified on residency last November, having left New Zealand’s Chiefs to join Leinster in 2017, and marked his first Test against Wales with a try. Now he will be hoping to add to his scoring tally as part of Ireland’s Six Nations squad. Test call: Ireland’s James Lowe during the Autumn Nations Cup (Getty Images) Here we talk to those who have known Lowe, now 28, at different points in his life to discover more about him and his rugby journey…THE TEACHERPeter Grigg taught Lowe PE at Nelson College and also coached him in the school’s first XV from 2008 to 2010“It was obvious he had talent as he was first in the team as a young fella. Boys don’t normally spend three years in the first XV, so you could see straightaway there was a lot of potential there. He was a very good athlete – he played basketball and cricket as well and also did athletics – and you could see he was a talented young man. His pace, strength, power off the mark and ability to read the game stood out.School days: Lowe (15) in action for Nelson College (Nelson College)“The first year I coached him, in 2008, he missed a lot of the season (after being diagnosed with juvenile arthritis). That was a tough year for him, but the character of the young man means I wasn’t surprised that he was able to overcome adversity. He’s a winner.“He played a bit at centre for us but mainly full-back. In a quadrangular tournament up in Whanganui in 2010, I recall him receiving a kick at full-back with the other 29 players in front of him and going through everyone pretty much untouched to score a try. Outstanding.“In school, he was very friendly, well respected by his peers and a great kid. He was well known for breaking the school rules on wearing socks with sandals but he always got away with that, teachers never pulled him up on it!“He’s a loyal Nelson College man. He always pops in and has a word with the first XV boys, watches games. He’s very supportive to the school. Nelson College has had a lot of All Blacks and one other Irish international, Jared Payne.”THE MENTORAfter coaching Lowe at Nelson College, Andrew Goodman played alongside him at Tasman Mako in the early 2010s“I had James in the U14s team in my first year coaching at Nelson College, then coached him at first XV level a bit. He had an amazing skill-set, size and speed, from a young age. He had lots of energy and has been like that ever since I’ve known him. He’d always come to training with a smile on his face.“It was tough for him being so active and then being limited in what he could do at the stage he was diagnosed with arthritis. To his credit he came back and worked really hard to get back his size and conditioning that he’d lost.“Later I played against him in the local club competition – him for Waimea Old Boys, me for Nelson RFC. I remember him scoring a try against us at Trafalgar Park and getting pretty boisterous!Action man: James Lowe breaks for Tasman Makos (Getty Images)“We were in the same group at Tasman for a couple of seasons before I went to Leinster, then I came back in a coaching role at Tasman and he was in that group as well. He turned up every day to get better. We had guys from outside the region who could see the passion he had for the jersey and what it meant to him to play for the jersey, so there was a lot of respect for him. He still keeps a close eye on Tasman now.“When he signed for Leinster I got in contact with him to say what an amazing club it is and what an amazing place Dublin is, how good the set-up is there. I knew he’d go over and thrive. He brings something different with the way he plays and his ability to beat defenders.“He deserves to be on the international stage and it’s awesome to see him go on to the next level.” This article originally appeared in the December 2020 edition 0f Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. THE COACHTom Coventry was part of the coaching set-up at the Chiefs, where Lowe spent four years before joining Leinster“I watched James play as a schoolboy. He played on the left wing and had this massive left foot so could do long raking punts out of the 22. We (Chiefs coaches) watched him play for Tasman, where he was on one wing and Bryce Heem was on the other.“We had conversations with the coaches, Kieran Keane and Leon MacDonald, about the two wings and they both gave different answers – Leon in favour of James and Kieran for Bryce – so they both ended up at the Chiefs!“James really caught the eye on the left edge of the field; he was pretty exciting with ball in hand, had a great sidestep and nice shimmy, stayed well away from the touchline and managed to link up with inside support really well.“We had a really positive mindset of attacking out of our own half; James was a big part of that, he fitted into that well. It was quite unusual for us to exit out of our own half as our policy was to look to counter-attack first, but if nothing was on we’d rely on James to use his foot to kick us out of trouble. He could kick or beat people with his footwork.In the clear: James Lowe leads a Chiefs attack (Getty Images)“The try I remember was against the Crusaders in Christchurch (in 2014). It was a close game and he played on the right wing that day. He intercepted the ball on the 22 and ran 60-70 metres down the touchline to score in the corner and put the game out of reach. That was one of his early games for us and I remember cheering him home.“We based a lot of our recruitment on putting people in the team who added value not just as a rugby player but as a person. He was a pretty confident, chirpy member of the team. He had a gregarious attitude and personality that’s easy to get along with. A good character and good fun.“He used to share a flat with Matt Symons and the landlord once told them they had to mow the lawn, so my uncle went to cut the grass for them. I remember him coming back and saying, ‘It was like a jungle’. The grass was about a metre high – they’d never mown it since they’d been there!“We would have liked to have kept him at the Chiefs but there’s something that draws young Kiwi boys to the northern hemisphere; the salaries you can earn are a big part of it but it’s also just the overseas experience. Some guys go later in their career after seeing if they can make the All Blacks; James chose to go early. He was in the frame, I’m not saying he was guaranteed to make the All Blacks but he was playing good footy. We all wished him well when he left and it has certainly worked out for him.”THE CAPTAINIreland fly-half Johnny Sexton has played alongside, and captained, Lowe at Leinster for the past three years“I’d watched a lot of Super Rugby and seen him for the Chiefs, then when you know you’re signing someone it’s like player cam: rather than watch the game, you look for the guy you’ve signed.“I thought he was a very impressive player then and he’s been even more impressive since he got here. The energy he brings and his enthusiasm for the game is infectious. He’s been a big part of the success at Leinster.“Sometimes when you sign players from overseas it can be hard to get a really good player and a really good person at the same time, and it’s arguably more important to bring in the right person who may be a lesser player. We’re very lucky as he’s brilliant in the environment and a brilliant player.“He came from a strong environment with the Chiefs and that’s good for us as we’re able to ask him what he would do with the Chiefs, from a cultural point of view or a rugby point of view. Leinster are getting that intellectual property.“There are the strengths everyone sees – he’s a very good finisher, a very good ball-carrier. People might not see his work-rate off the ball, his energy, his communication. He’ll run in from the side of the pitch to congratulate the props on a good scrum or winning a penalty and is one of those guys who gives you great snippets of information.“He’s very popular and is able to hang around with the young guys as well as the old guys, as opposed to me who is firmly in the old brigade. If I tried to talk to the academy guys, they’d be thinking, ‘I have nothing in common with this guy’! James brings the younger and older groups together. He treats everyone the same and that’s what we try to do at Leinster and with Ireland now under Andy Farrell. Everyone gets a voice.“He is passionate about Leinster and he won’t take it (getting capped by Ireland) lightly, he realises the privilege afforded and will definitely make the most of it.“He takes rugby seriously but it’s not the be-all and end-all and he lets that shine through. I could learn from him on that!” Coaches and team-mates past and present tell us about the Leinster winger’s route to Test rugbylast_img read more

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GOOD NEWS: Scholarship funds presented to local colleges

first_img By admin – April 1, 2018 GOOD NEWS: Scholarship funds presented to local colleges Pinterest WhatsApp Pinterest Local News WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Twitter Facebook The Odessa Board of Realtors’ Annual Christmas Tour of Homes raised more than $24,000 for local colleges.These scholarships were awarded to each college at a luncheon March 27.This is the 24th year the Odessa Board of Realtors has hosted the Christmas Tour of Homes. The following homeowners generously opened their homes on Dec. 3 to allow the community to take part in raising scholarships for local colleges: Tonjua and Darrel Farris, Cheryl and Tony Cunningham; Sarah and Clay Moore; and Carol and Travis Fisher.Jeff Meyers, executive director for advancement, and Kim McKay, vice president for student services and enrollment management, accepted the scholarship funds on behalf of Odessa College.Tatum Hubbard, chief of staff/executive director of communications, accepted the scholarship funds on behalf of the University of Texas of the Permian Basin. Previous articleELAM: Volatility rises, commodity rally on holdNext articleBoard to discuss TRE, bond, rezoning adminlast_img read more

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Lithuanian Man blames sexual assault on flashbacks to his time in Russian Special Forces

first_imgA 51-year old man who sexually assaulted a teenage girl at Dublin Airport after wrestling her to the ground in public has been ordered to undergo a full psychiatric assessment.The Lithuanian national with an address in Letterkenny told gardaí he was having flashbacks to when he worked in the Russian Special Forces in Siberia and believed he was protecting his girlfriend from falling bombs.Liudas Vaisvilas, with an address at Glenveagh Court, Letterkenny, Co Donegal, pleaded guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to sexual assault at Terminal 2 in Dublin Airport on April 10, 2014.Hours after he was released from garda custody following the incident, Vaisvilas was arrested for sexually assaulting a young girl in a similar way at Eddie Rocket’s Diner on O’Connell Street. Judge Patrick McCartan said while Vaisvilas might well try to explain away the first incident on the basis of having drunk vodka, he was not drunk at the time of the second sexual assault.The judge expressed concern that whatever was troubling Vaisvilas could lead to repeat offences. He remanded him in custody for sentencing next February, pending a full psychiatric assessment and updated probation report. Garda Tanya Shinkins told Noel Carroll BL, defending, that the 19-year-old victim was sitting in the airport at about 10:30 waiting for a flight when Vaisvilas walked right up and put his face very close to her. He asked her repeatedly if she had the internet and then sat down beside her and grabbed her between her legs.The girl was in shock and started screaming for help but a man sitting near her seemed also too shocked to help. The girl went running towards two airport officials for help but Vaisvilas rugby-tackled her to the ground. He had one hand between her legs and the other on her bottom and the girl said she felt helpless and couldn’t breathe as he was so strong.Airport authorities and members of the public managed to get Vaisvilas off the girl and he was arrested shortly after midnight.Vaisvilas said he was shocked when shown CCTV footage of the incident and wanted to apologise and explain to the girl that he had been “crazy” and “confused in his mind”.Dominic McGinn SC, defending, said his client’s mother and another relative had died recently, and he had missed a flight home to Lithuania for a funeral.He had not slept for the previous five or six days, had drunk some vodka, and was having flashbacks to when he worked in the Russian army, counsel said.Vaisvilas was previously sentenced to six months’ suspended for the second sexual assault in Eddie Rocket’s Diner. He has one other conviction for road traffic offences.Vaisvilas has lived in Ireland for nine years and worked at a meat-packing plant in Letterkenny.Judge McCartan adjourned sentencing until February 2 next and said Vaisvilas will get full credit for the time he has spent in custody.The court heard Vaisvilas has been in custody since the offence because he was unable to pay the €1,500 required under his High Court bail. Lithuanian Man blames sexual assault on flashbacks to his time in Russian Special Forces Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Homepage BannerNews RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th WhatsApp Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry By News Highland – December 19, 2014 Previous articleMc Conalogue accuses education minister of bypassing Donegal in School Building ProgrammeNext articleWater bill should be law by Christmas after passing second stage in Seanad News Highland Pinterestcenter_img Twitter 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Twitter Pinterest Facebook 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Facebook Google+ Google+last_img read more

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Follow the rules of engagement

first_imgFollow the rules of engagementOn 4 May 2004 in Personnel Today Despite all the scare stories in the media, the enlargement of the EuropeanUnion needn’t hold any fears for the savvy HR professional. Workers from the 10 accession countries are now legally entitled to work inthe UK, and employers should regard this as a golden opportunity to fillchronic skills gaps and boost productivity – after all, we’re short of a fewhundred thousand workers in the construction industry alone. It is also an opportunity for HR to demonstrate its value to the board byputting the right policies in place to ensure compliance with the law. Bysimply following the rules of engagement, HR can minimise the chances of organisationsemploying staff illegally, thereby avoiding the possibility of being fined fordoing so. And at £5,000 per illegal worker, those fines could soon add up. Some organisations will no doubt be thinking that the easiest route would beto simply ignore jobseekers from the new EU countries. But any smart HRprofessional would be able to advise them of the folly of that route, as itwould amount to discrimination on the grounds of nationality. ‘But look at all that red tape’, I hear you cry. Well, the reality, asoutlined on page 25, is far from onerous. Yes, there are some extra hoops tojump through – but not many. And by keeping disruption to a minimum, we willsee the benefits of welcoming this addition to the labour pool, and betterunderstand how good HR can make a difference. Startling statistic The news that Whitbread and BSkyB have created board-level HR appointmentsis, perhaps, a sign that the function is at last beginning to make inroads intostrategic thinking in big business. And, on the face of it, this news wouldseem to counter the accusation in last week’s issue that senior HR executivesare not up to the job. Carlsberg UK’s chief executive Colin Povey attacked the low calibre ofsenior HR professionals after spending more than six months looking for asuitable candidate for the post of HR director. So our news barometer pollasked readers ‘Is senior HR up to scratch?’. The response was emphatic: morethan 80 per cent of you said ‘no’. This is a startling statistic. And one that suggests HR has some way to gobefore being automatically considered for a place on the board. Clearly thisneeds further investigation. So let us know why you feel that senior HR isfailing so miserably. E-mail your concerns to [email protected] Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Inland thinning of West Antarctic Ice Sheet steered along subglacial rifts

first_imgCurrent ice loss from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) accounts for about ten per cent of observed global sea-level rise1. Losses are dominated by dynamic thinning, in which forcings by oceanic or atmospheric perturbations to the ice margin lead to an accelerated thinning of ice along the coastline2, 3, 4, 5. Although central to improving projections of future ice-sheet contributions to global sea-level rise, the incorporation of dynamic thinning into models has been restricted by lack of knowledge of basal topography and subglacial geology so that the rate and ultimate extent of potential WAIS retreat remains difficult to quantify. Here we report the discovery of a subglacial basin under Ferrigno Ice Stream up to 1.5 kilometres deep that connects the ice-sheet interior to the Bellingshausen Sea margin, and whose existence profoundly affects ice loss. We use a suite of ice-penetrating radar, magnetic and gravity measurements to propose a rift origin for the basin in association with the wider development of the West Antarctic rift system. The Ferrigno rift, overdeepened by glacial erosion, is a conduit which fed a major palaeo-ice stream on the adjacent continental shelf during glacial maxima6. The palaeo-ice stream, in turn, eroded the ‘Belgica’ trough, which today routes warm open-ocean water back to the ice front7 to reinforce dynamic thinning. We show that dynamic thinning from both the Bellingshausen and Amundsen Sea region is being steered back to the ice-sheet interior along rift basins. We conclude that rift basins that cut across the WAIS margin can rapidly transmit coastally perturbed change inland, thereby promoting ice-sheet instability.last_img read more

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Don’t Feed Red Foxes: Council Wants to Get Tough

first_imgSaying he’s heard reports from neighbors of Brown’s Restaurant that they’ve witnessed children leaving plates of doughnuts for red foxes, Councilman Mike DeVlieger said Thursday that he’d like the city to consider creating an ordinance specifically prohibiting feeding the wild animals.“There’s a certain level of intelligence you have to have to tell your children not to feed the foxes,” DeVlieger said in a half-hearted attempt to be diplomatic at the public council meeting on Thursday.Business Administrator Jim Mallon said he believes an existing ordinance about feeding wildlife would suffice in allowing the city to post signs on the boardwalk near Brown’s and enforce the ban.A sign at Brown’s asks customers not to feed the foxes. Credit: Noel WirthBrown’s has posted its own signs asking customers not to feed the animals.Ocean City is home to a growing population of red foxes, and the animals are becoming increasingly comfortable with their human neighbors. (See gallery of reader photos of red foxes in Ocean City.)With pups grown enough to leave their dens by June, fox sightings increase in late spring and early summer — particularly on trash nights and in places where people might be feeding them, according to Bill Hollingsworth, executive director of the Humane Society of Ocean City, which is responsible for animal control in the municipality._________Also from City Council on Thursday:Council Takes Power to Clean Up Eyesore Gas Stations: Council RoundupPickleball Players Rally for Permanent Home in Ocean City_________The Humane Society is not allowed to euthanize a healthy animal, and state law forbids them from relocating wildlife off the island (except to rehabilitation centers willing to accept them), Hollingsworth told OCNJ Daily last year. There are several active dens in Ocean City, he said.Hollingsworth said in the four years the Humane Society has been doing animal control in Ocean City, it has received no report of aggressiveness to people or animals and it has identified no rabid or diseased foxes.“People don’t need to be afraid of them,” he said. “They do come out.”He said people should be educated about them — never feed them, use lids on trash cans and use outdoor lighting to keep them away from backyards. They are most active in the early morning and late evening.The animals typically are less visible as the kits grow older and the peak summer crowds arrive.__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter“Like” us on Facebook A red fox poses for photographs by passing boardwalk pedestrians in the evening next to Brown’s Restaurant on the Ocean City Boardwalk at St. Charles Place.last_img read more

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Bakers’ Bolton Bonanza

first_imgIndependent bakers in the north of England and as far afield as Scotland and Devon have registered to attend the latest in the Bakers’ Fair series of regional roadshows, taking place at Bolton Arena on October 14.The one-day fair brings together a host of specialised bakery exhibitors, including millers, ingredients manufacturers, machinery suppliers, drinks companies, wholesalers and other key service suppliers.It will be an ideal opportunity for visitors to catch up with peers in the region and around the country and also pick up new ideas on trends and innovations in the ever-evolving bakery market.And for the first time in 2007, the Richemont Club of Great Britain, which has a membership of top craft bakers and confectioners, will be holding its annual competition at the Fair, and hosting a live competition during the day.Members of the Club will be baking up their finest efforts for judging in 20 classes, ranging from fresh creams to Christmas novelties, with newly introduced classes for young bakers.team competitionThe live competition and demonstration will see five teams of two competing for the President’s Cup, which will be presented to the team that does the best job of decorating a three-tier sugarpaste wedding cake.Richemont members Peter Herd Cakes (Wilmslow), Slattery’s Patissier and Chocolatier (Manchester), Chatwins of Nantwich, Classic Celebration Cakes (Cheshire) and Christopher Rose (Sheffield) have all put forward teams.Richemont president Trevor Mooney (pictured) tells British Baker that, with entries due in shortly, he hopes a record number of entrants will show off their talents in the various classes, including the new under-21 classes. These, aimed at student and trainee bakers and those at the beginning of their careers, include Four Fruit Scones and One Round Pizza.Mooney says: “We are very excited to be holding our annual competition alongside Bakers’ Fair for the first time. We are expecting a record number of entries again. Last year at our competition in Manchester we had 210. With the competition being held on a Sunday, more people should be able to get to it.”But if you want to take part, hurry. Entries need to be in to Kevin Pearce at Chatwins by 26 September. See [http://www.bakersfair.co.uk] for full details.The Bakers Fair North West follows on from the successful Edinburgh Bakers’ Fair, held last October. It opens from 9.30am to 4pm. You can still register to attend for free on the website [http://www.bakersfair.co.uk], or by calling 01792 365906. nAround the show:last_img read more

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Bringing home the biscuits: Biscuiteers, London

first_imgWith its bright white façade, hand-illustrated signage and outdoor seating area, the exterior of Biscuiteers’ new HQ stands out from the crowd,  just as the concept of gifting biscuits through the post did when founder Harriet Hastings and her husband, Stevie Congdon, came up with the idea 12 years ago.Now there are others in the category, but that doesn’t get to Hastings. “It’s great that people have followed us into this sector,” she tells us. “But I hope that people can recognise a Biscuiteers biscuit and know that they’re the best around.”Hastings and her team moved to the new purpose-built facility in October this year. After years of operating five separate production sites, it was time to unite the teams under one roof.“Moving here has enabled us to be so much more efficient,” says Caroline Grant, head of production. “It has helped us to build a better understanding of each area and there’s more of an appreciation ofwhat each team does. It has also cut out logistical problems such as biscuits being broken in transit.”The team is made up of eight bakers and, at the time of British Baker’s visit, 70 icers, some of whom were on seasonal contracts for Christmas. There’s also a packaging team, who label each gift tin by hand, and more staff working in the office area.The facility produces around 8,000 biscuits per day, as well as cakes for Christmas and iced chocolates, which are imported from Belgium and decorated on-site. It also has an area dedicated to production for its two shops – one in Notting Hill and one in Battersea – where it sells cakes, biscuits and afternoon tea.“When you’re predominantly an online business, it’s really important to have some kind of experiential space,” says Hastings. “The shops are very important for us – they’re a great marketing tool for the business.”They’re also one of the things Hastings is most proud of, along with the two books she has produced, the Royal biscuit collections, and a cityscape window installation at Selfridges in 2013.Now, she wants to focus on experiences and launching pop-ups, for example the one it has in Covent Garden for the festive season, featuring a gingerbread replica of the area’s famous market. “Pop-ups are a more interesting way for us to take the brand into new spaces,” she explains.Biscuiteers, LondonWho: Harriet Hastings, founder of BiscuiteersWhat: A new purpose-built office and production facility, spanning 20,000 sq ft.Where: Unit 2 Greenlea Park, Prince George’s Road, Wimbledon, SW19 2JDWhen: Hastings founded the business with her husband Stevie Congdon in 2007. The team moved to the new facility in October 2019.Why: The business had previously operated across five production and office spaces in the Kennington and Camberwell areas, so decided it was time to unite under one roof. The move has brought the team together and allowed them each to see the process from start to finish.Equipment: Kit used in the bakery includes a Metronics water cutter, Canol sheeter (pictured), Polin four-rack oven, Rondo dough break and dough press, and a Hobart mixer.Icers: “Those with a creative background, such as an A-level in art, tend to be the most successful,” says Caroline Grant, head of production.Inspiration: “We take inspiration from things we’ve posted on Instagram. We also look at sales from previous years and trends for the year ahead,” says Lucy Simmons, head of icing.Hand-illustrated: “The packaging is very unique,” says Hastings, noting that every packaging design is hand- illustrated by the in-house illustrator.Add-ons: Areas of expansion for the business include add-ons aimed at gift boxes, such as its partnerships with Tregothan Teas and English sparkling wine manufacturer Gusbourne.Delivery: Biscuiteers promises that any order placed before 1pm will be dispatched the same day. “People have high expectations, and we have to deliver,” says Hastings.last_img read more

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