August, 2020 Archive

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Local Teens ‘Do Something’ to Collect School Supplies for Boys &…

first_imgAbout DoSomething.org:DoSomething.org is the nation’s largest organization dedicating to empowering young people to take action around any cause.  By leveraging communications technologies and social media, DoSomething.org enables teens to convert their ideas and energy into positive action.  The award-winning site inspires, empowers and celebrates a generation of doers:  teenagers who recognize the need to do something, believe in their ability to get it done, and then take action.  Plug in at www.DoSomething.org. Request an Action Kit: Whether it’s summer camp, summer sports leagues, or at neighborhood block parties, students can get tips, resources, and flyers on running their own school supply drives in their neighborhoods.Text SUPPLIES to 38383: Students will receive more information on how to begin their own school supply drive or find their nearest Staples drop-off location (standard text messaging rates apply).Join a Pretty Little Liar: When teens log-on and select their favorite star from the campaign, $1 will be donated by Staples (up to $10,000) to the cause and in turn, teens will get exclusive, behind-the-scenes details from the actresses.Check in on Foursquare: Starting July 3rd, teens who check-in at any Staples store on Foursquare will also have a $1 donated on their behalf by Staples to the campaign (up to $5,000). About Staples:Staples is the world’s largest office products company and a trusted source for office solutions.  The company provides products, services and expertise in office supplies, copy & print, technology, facilities and breakroom, and furniture.  Staples invented the office superstore concept in 1986 and now has annual sales of $25 billion, ranking second in the world in eCommerce sales. With 90,000 associates worldwide, Staples operates in 26 countries throughout North and South America, Europe, Asia and Australia, making it easy for businesses of all sizes, and consumers. The company is headquartered outside Boston. More information about Staples (Nasdaq: SPLS) is available at www.staples.com/media.About The Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston CountyBoys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County (BGCTC) is a youth development agency serving school-age youth 5-18 years old. Founded in 2001, four Club locations now serve over 2,000 local youth with the mission of inspiring and enabling young people, especially those in greatest need, to realize their full potential as productive, responsible citizens, by providing community-based Clubs that are safe and positive places for kids. BGCTC offers programming in five key areas: Character & Leadership Development; Education & Career Development; Health & Life Skills; The Arts; and Sports, Fitness and Recreation. For more information about BGCTC, please visit www.bgctc.org. “DoSomething.org is all about action,” said Nancy Lublin, CEO and Chief Old Person at DoSomething.org.  “We’re proud to continue our relationship with Staples on a campaign that gives young people the power to rock social change and really make a difference among their peers in their very own communities.”To further demonstrate support for DoSomething.org, Staples is continuing with their line of DoSomething.org-inspired products. This year features designs developed by students who won a contest to have their creative artwork showcased on products at Staples stores.  These designs inspire fellow teens to take action in their community and will be available at Staples retail stores by July 3rd.  Students interested in submitting artwork for the 2012 design contest can visit www.dosomething.org/products/contests to submit their designs by June 5. Facebook0Tweet0Pin0Olympia, WA (July 21, 2011) – DoSomething.org and Staples are teaming up with the stars from ABC Family’s hit show Pretty Little Liars for the Staples for Students – Do Something for Kids in Need national school supply drive (www.staplesforstudents.org). School supplies collected in Thurston County will benefit youth at Boys & Girls Clubs in Lacey, Olympia, Tumwater, and Rochester to equip them with tools they need to achieve academic success.As part of the Staples for Students campaign (www.staplesforstudents.org), the stars of Pretty Little Liars — Lucy Hale, Troian Bellisario, Ashley Benson, and Shay Mitchell — are encouraging Thurston County teens to make a difference this summer by collecting school supplies and dropping them off at their nearest Staples store from July 3rd through September 17th. In addition, Staples customers will be able to get involved by donating $1 at any Staples store, with 100 percent of the proceeds benefiting local students in need.All school supplies and donations will be given to Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County to ensure they get into the hands of disadvantaged youth just in time for the new school year. As a national partner with Boys & Girls Clubs of America, Staples supports the organization’s mission to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens. The Staples for Students school supply enables Club youth to achieve great futures by helping young people in need return to school prepared to learn and succeed.“We are all thrilled to be the force behind this year’s Staples for Students campaign,” said Lucy Hale.  “After participating in last year’s backpack stuffing event and sharing my experience with my cast-mates, we all knew we wanted to be a part of this great cause to encourage teens to make a difference to help students start the year off right.”Since 2008, in growing the campaign along with DoSomething.org, Staples has helped to raise nearly $2 million and has donated hundreds of thousands in school supplies for students in need throughout the country. Past celebrity supporters include singers Jordin Sparks, Ciara and Twilight star Nikki Reed.“It’s hard to imagine sending your kids back to school without proper supplies, but the reality is that countless students face this challenge every year, “said Christine Mallon, vice president of retail marketing at Staples.  “With help from our celebrities, Staples is ready to rally the public to get out and do something for kids who need our help the most this summer.”The campaign invites all area teens and residents of any age to participate in the supply drive by donating school supplies at the Staples stores in West Olympia (1200 Cooper Point Rd.) and Chehalis (1740 National Ave). The Staples for Students campaign is offering easy, innovative and new ways for teens to get involved in this year’s programs. By visiting www.staplesforstudents.org, teens can sign-up or get more information to take action: ### Sarah AustinMarketing CoordinatorBoys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County(360) 956-0755www.bgctc.orglast_img read more

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LOTT’s Wet Science Center Hiring Environmental Education Assistant – AmeriCorps

first_imgSubmitted by LOTT Clean Water Alliance’s Wet Science Center LOTT Clean Water Alliance’s WET Science Center provides the community with a fun, hands-on opportunity to learn all about water – one of our most precious resources.The WET Science Center is hiring an AmeriCorps Individual Placement through the WA Service Corps Program to serve as a full-time Environmental Education Assistant from October 1, 2014 to August 15, 2015.The WET Science Center is hiring an Environmental Education Assistant, through the AmeriCorps program.  Applicants must be 18-25 years old.Join our education team and help teach thousands of students how to conserve and protect water.  Monthly stipend equals $1,125 plus benefits. Facebook0Tweet0Pin0last_img

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After Storm Nursery School Returns to Belford

first_imgBy John BurtonMIDDLETOWN – “We’re home again,” Jennifer Macchia, director of the Spice Tree School, said with a broad smile as the children and staff entered their restored facility five months after Sandy knocked the nursery and day care facility back on its heels.Spice Tree, 180 Church St., in the township’s Belford section, on Monday greeted its approximately 40 students, ages 6 months to 5 years old, once again at what has been the school’s location, leased from the neighboring Belford United Methodist Church, for the school’s 30-year history.Executive Director Jennifer Macchia (left) and teacher Pat Perry join some of their young students at Spice Tree School, in Middletown’s Belford section, as it reopened this week after experiencing damage from Super Storm Sandy.As a result of the late October storm that battered much of the area, more than three feet of water flooded the privately owned child care facility. According to Macchia and owner Lance Jordan, the tidal surges and flooding from Raritan Bay caused a neighboring creek to rise and wash through the building, wrecking the school and destroying much of the site’s equipment.As the water receded, it left about six inches of sludge in the school’s first floor, Macchia said, and the flood caused the kitchen’s large refrigerator to float over to the other side of the room. Jordan said about 80 percent of the facility and its contents was damaged and had to be discarded or replaced.When he saw it, Jordan said, “I wanted to cry.”“The cribs were floating upside down,” Macchia remembered.Jordan and the church shared the renovation and repair expenses; the church paid for 70 percent of the work to the facility. The building needed walls, flooring and carpeting, cabinets, kitchen sink and refrigerator replac­ed, as well as electrical work completed before students and staff could return, he said. Jordan’s share of the work came to roughly $80,000. He also had to replace the two small buses and two vans that were parked in the lot when the storm hit, he said.With the location clearly incapable of being used for the immediate future, Macchia said the church’s board of trustees stepped up and were “instantaneously supportive,” agreeing to allow the school to use the church’s large community hall, adjacent to the main church.“It was the Christian thing to do,” said Arliene Zaborney, president of the church’s board.Once the electricity was restored to the location, nearly two weeks after the storm, Macchia, Jordan and his wife Joann, and the staff, set up the interim operation, with assistance from students’ families, who also provided much needed items, like high chairs and disposable diapers.Along with that help, Macchia noted Spice Tree received generous assistance from the Middletown Veter­ans of Foreign Wars and other organizations, which donated toys and other items. Save The Children charitable organization donated $5,000, and Giving Nest, a North Plainfield preschool, gave equipment for Spice Tree’s small gym area, Macchia said.On the school’s official first day this week, Macchia and the Jordans joined Middletown Deputy Mayor Stephanie Murray for the ribbon cutting and celebrated the school’s return. “It’s very moving when you see this,” Murray said, as children scampered about and operations were back. “It just makes you feel good.”All of the school’s children have returned and for them, the returning is significant, Macchia observed, “because it brings them back to their comfort zone” and a return to normalcy. About five of the families remain displaced due to the damage to their homes, she said.“And it is all about the children,” stressed Jordan, who has owned the school for eight years.last_img read more

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Long-Dormant Colts Neck Townhouse Development Advances

first_imgWestminster Management’s concept for new townhouses inColts Neck.COLTS NECK – A proposal to build 48 upscale townhomes on a 39.57-acre vacant tract along County Route 537 here is expected to receive final planning board approval on April 14. The project by Westminster Management, a division of Kushner Companies (also known as Colts Neck Building Associates, LLC), was originally approved in 2004 following a lengthy lawsuit and many contentious public meetings attended by overflow crowds opposing it.The site is across from, and slightly west of, Colts Neck High School, opposite Five Points Park. The only other development of its kind in the township is The Grande, a single and multifamily development near Route 18 and the Westminster site that satisfied some of Colts Neck’s affordable housing obligation when it was constructed in the mid-1990s.According to Colts Neck Township Planner Timothy Anfuso, it’s “basically the same development but everything has shrunk” to keep construction outside a 300 foot riparian buffer protecting a sensitive Category One stream designated by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), which feeds into the Swimming River. The development is expected to maintain its original composition of four courtyards with three buildings per courtyard and four units per building.Anfuso said it was the imposition of the 300-foot buffer requirements by the DEP that contributed to halting the project, originally slated to break ground in 2004. Two detention basins and a retaining wall were constructed then, as well as a dirt ramp; now overgrown. Westminster’s revised application has come before the planning board twice so far, in January and March of this year. According to Township Administrator Robert Bowden, the township committee adopted two “A-1” consent resolutions on March 25 relating to the development’s proposed water treatment plant, confirming it complies with local ordinances.At the site of a Colts Neck townhome development that began in 2004, the only visible evidence of early construction is an overgrown dirt ramp and a white trailer that has remained on the property since. The developer recently resurrected the project. Photo: Laura D. KolnoskiGordon Gemma, in-house counsel for Westminster, said the project was resurrected now, “because the marketplace has returned and there seems to be interest in this type of project which did not exist before.” He said the size of the units has been reduced from an average of 3,600 to an average 3,000 square feet. The townhouses remain high end, with estimated pricing in the “high $700,000s.” Pricing in 2004 was projected at $700,000 – $750,000.Additional premium features and upgrades will be available. There are two different unit designs, with two or three bedrooms upstairs and a master bedroom downstairs. Each will have a two-car garage and some will have walkouts depending on location.The project’s revised exterior design has also been approved by the Colts Neck Architectural Review Committee. That body’s chairwoman, Lillian Burry, was the deputy mayor originally charged with leading the township’s case against Westminster, which dragged on for four years. In May 2004, following a settlement, the Township Committee passed the final ordinances allowing the project to proceed.At the time, the proposed development followed Mt. Laurel affordable housing litigation and was intended to provide 263 low and moderate income dwellings. Westminster charged that Colts Neck had not fulfilled its affordable housing quota obligations set by the Coalition on Affordable Housing (COAH). Through the settlement, the township prevailedin reducing the development to 48 upscale townhomes aimed at empty nesters and retirees, so as not to impact the school system. Officials hoped the development would be attractive to locals looking to downsize but remain in Colts Neck.“There are always developers searching municipalities looking for vulnerable spots they can cite for builder’s relief cases,” Burry, now a Monmouth County Freeholder and owner of Colts Neck Realty, said in December 2003. “We came out on the upper end; it could have been much worse.” Fast-forward to April 2, 2015 when Burry said, “Colts Neck was considered amongst the most vulnerable after Mt. Laurel. Now, the township needs this. It is alternative housing that we don’t really have available other than The Grande.”Anfuso said the revised project must still obtain re-approval from the Monmouth County Planning Board for right-of-way on Rt. 537. Gemma said Westminster has already submitted its revised plans to the DEP, which will ensure the modifications are compliant with current DEP regulations that went into effect after the original approvals. Burry is one of three freeholder representatives on the county planning board.“We anticipate having all we need to get going by the end of June,” Gemma said. Before construction can begin, the site will be cleaned up, a general contractor will be hired and the project will go out to bid. While it could take two years to complete the project, the construction timetable depends on pre-and ongoing sales. Gemma responded to local officials’ questions regarding whether Westminster would sell the development to another firm once all approvals are obtained.“Right now, we are not in contract with anybody,” he said. “It’s our anticipation to go for ward. Of course, we would consider any reasonable offer. It will be a wonderful project that fits into Colts Neck. — By Laura D. Kolnoskilast_img read more

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Monmouth Medical Receives $1 Million Gift

first_imgLONG BRANCH – Monmouth Medical Center has received a $1 million donation from the Tigger House Foundation to support the medical center’s response to the opioid overdose crisis, according to the medical center.The gift will fund a private consultation room in Monmouth’s Emergency Department. The newly-designed area will give patients and families dealing with substance abuse a place to meet with physicians, recovery specialists, patient navigators and counselors.Monmouth Medical Center is part of a state-grant-funded Opioid Overdose Recovery Program, which links individuals reversed from an opioid overdose with recovery support services and treatment after being seen in Monmouth Medical Center’s Emergency Department.Monmouth Medical Center will also work to honor the memory of “Tigger” Stavola through its efforts to reduce the stigma that surrounds the disease of addiction.“Our son, Rick Jr., who was known to friends and family as Tigger, was larger than life – he had a big heart and a special smile that would light up a room,” said Rick Stavola, who started the Tigger House Foundation with his wife, Lisa, in 2013 in memory of their son following his death from an accidental overdose. “If we can help prevent other families from going through what we did, we will have been successful and honored his memory. I believe this partnership with Monmouth Medical Center will help save more lives.”Bill Arnold, president and chief executive officer of Monmouth Medical Center, said “The statistics surrounding opioid use and overdose in Monmouth County are staggering. The generosity of the Tigger House Foundation will greatly assist Monmouth Medical Center in our efforts to combat this deadly epidemic.”The Tigger House Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to reducing the death rate of overdoses due to heroine and opiate addiction. The foundation also works to change public attitudes towards individuals who struggle with addiction by addressing the illicit heroine and opiate epidemic.Tigger House partners with government, law enforcement, legal and medical professionals to provide opportunities for rehabilitation and to halt the spread of illicit drugs through local dealers and prescription drug abuse. It maintains a 12-bed sober living house in Middletown. Managed by Oxford House, Tigger House is helping to establish sober-living housing throughout Monmouth and Ocean counties.“This heartfelt gift from the Tigger House Foundation ensures that patients and families struggling with addiction have access to the support they need,” said Tara Kelly, vice president of development, Monmouth Medical Center Foundation. “The work Tigger House and the Stavolas are doing in memory of their son is truly remarkable and will certainly make a difference in the lives of other families.”Last month, Tigger House announced a gift of $120,000 to Riverview Medical Center in Red Bank to fund an addictions counselor to be on call in the emergency room.last_img read more

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Mayoral Primary Race In Little Silver

first_imgNeff is being challenged by Rick Brandt, a 30-year-old resident with a passion for philanthropy and volunteerism, who says he plans to help the borough “evolve and grow in the 21st century” with improved communication. During a Feb. 25 interview with The Two River Times, Neff said he and the council are monitoring the Fort Monmouth situation, but his focus remains on challenges within the borough itself. “I’m concentrating on the challenges that are of immediate importance to our residents. And it’s not always sexy. It’s bread-and-butter stuff. And it’s our job, mine and the council, to work together and make sure we don’t break the back of the taxpayer while addressing these concerns,” Neff said. This includes his runningmates Donald Galante andcouncil president CorinneThygeson, who are also upfor re-election. “My church has a smartphone app you can download and watch sermons if you happen to miss one. This is inexpensive technology we should be offering our residents because they aren’t always able to make every meeting. We should make it easy for them,” Brandt told The Two River Times. LITTLE SILVER – The race for Little Silver’s Republican mayoral candidate will be decided at the June 4 primary, when two borough men with strong connections to the community face off. “I want to aggressively go after grant funding. There are literally millions of dollars in grants that are sitting out there for communities just like Little Silver. It takes a lot of effort, but it’s something we’ve had a lot of success with at Lunch Break and, if done correctly and assertively, there’s an opportunity to bring significant revenue into the community as well as stabilize taxes,” Brandt said. “It really is a significant expense and the county will not put them in. They always leave it up to the town and that puts a burden on the community. But the council is prepared to dig in and take on some limited debt to get these types of projects done,” Neff added. “And that’s unique to Little Silver. While other towns bond for capital projects, we’ve worked to put ourselves in a position to get it done in the most cost-effective way possible.” Brandt said he also has infrastructure on his mind, but hopes to approach funding for capital projects and beautification initiatives in a different way, and believes his work in the nonprofit sector, including a position on the board of trustees for Lunch Break in Red Bank, could be a big help. Brandt said he is also taking aim at the massive Fort Monmouth redevelopment project. “It’s a unique scenario. The shore area is basically getting a new town put in and it’s happening right next to us. We should be more heavily involved in those discussions because there will be a significant impact to Little Silver, both good and bad. We need to be proactive not reactive,” Brandt said, noting concerns about potential overflow traffic coming through the borough. Little Silver Mayor Robert Neff has announced he’ll make a run for his third consecutive four-year term and has received a full endorsement from the Little Silver Republican Party, as well as backing from all sitting members of the borough council. Neff said sidewalks and curbs can be the most expensive part of any roadwork project and several of the county roads cutting through borough neighborhoods are in need of both, which can be problematic. The mayor pointed to theupcoming hearing on LittleSilver’s affordable housingsettlement, as well as schoolfunding reforms needed atthe state level, as at the topof the list of priorities. Rick Brandt But no topic was morepressing for Neff than localinfrastructure, including theinstallation of sidewalks andcurbing in various parts ofa community known for itsfoot traffic. In order to better understand community needs, Brandt said he has embarked on a journey to knock on the doors of all 2,498 Little Silver households. During those conversations with homeowners Brandt said he is collecting data and, after approximately 850 doors, he is beginning to see trends, though he is not ready to speak about his findings. Despite the effort and Brandt’s service time on the recreation committee and shade tree commission, Neff said it’s experience that sets these two candidates apart. The fort’s Oceanport Avenue entrance is located less than a mile away from the Little Silver train station and Brandt believes the time is now for the borough to get involved in the revitalization efforts of the 1,127-acre parcel and its approximately 1,000 standing structures that stretch across portions of Eatontown, Tinton Falls and Oceanport. “It’s important to have someone in place with a real sense about how government works; with a desire to make people happy, but an understanding that you can’t be successful at that 100 percent of the time,” said Neff. “There are going to be tough decisions you need to make. I’ve helped make those decisions with over a decade of service in our municipal government. That experience is an enormous advantage.”last_img read more

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Local Environmental Orgs React to News

first_imgAfter a rousing rendition of “Celebration” by Kool and the Gang, Cindy Zipf, executive director of Clean Ocean Action (COA) based in Long Branch, said, “Congratulations! We beat NESE!” and apologized for getting a little emotional. “This is truly a remarkable, remarkable victory,” she said, thanking all the volunteers who worked to reach this outcome through petitions, letters, rallies and calls to elected officials. She also recognized the COA staff “who all worked very, very hard over the last year and a half…to bring this victory.” “Our air, bay and ocean are safe for now!!” Zipf said in an email to The Two River Times. On the Zoom celebration, Matt Smith from Food & Water Watch also thanked all the volunteers and elected officials who helped achieve this outcome. “This win is about us, right? This win does not happen without thousands of us taking action here in New Jersey, without so many dedicated volunteers… without a strategic coalition that really fought over a historic four-year campaign with a singular goal of getting Gov. Murphy to reject these permits,” he said. “This is a great victory and a great modelof working together at both the local leveland with elected officials,” he said. According to Smith, this was the first time New Jersey stopped a project already approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the agency that regulates the interstate transmission of natural gas. More than 100 people logged on to a Zoom meeting held by local environmental organizations Monday, May 18 to celebrate the denial of permits by Gov. Phil Murphy for the Transco Northeast Supply Enhancement (NESE) project. By Elizabeth Wulfhorst Peter Blair, the policy attorney for COA,thanked everyone for making sure NESE“remained a proposal and never a reality.” PATRICK OLIVERO Rallies like this one in 2019 organized by Clean Ocean Action and other grassroots coalitions helped lead to the denial of permits by both New Jersey and New York officials for a proposed natural gas pipeline under Raritan Bay. “When we come together and stay together with that singular focus to hold our elected official accountable,” goals can be accomplished, Smith said. And Jeff Tittel, the director of the New Jersey Sierra Club, who called Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York and Murphy the “Batman and Robin of the environment,” said getting people involved, putting pressure on elected officials and educating the public were the keys to success. The article originally appeared in the May 21 – 27, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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LVR Bombers run table at South Okanagan Fieldhockey Tournament

first_imgKeeper Rylee Zondervan registered three shutouts to lead the L.V. Rogers Bombers to an impressive 4-0 record at the South Okanagan Hornets Fieldhockey tournament Saturday in Oliver.In the process, the Bombers posted wins over G.W. Graham of Chilliwack, South Kamloops, Kelowna’s Mt. Boucherie and Agassiz Eagles.“Amazing tireless work by every player on the team,” said Bomber coach Bruce Walgren.“I was really proud to watch the team step and play so well, especially the rookies who have never played before and held their own.”Walgren held high praise for rookies Lakpa Dietz, Lisa Demski, Katharina Hayn and Kassandra Schloeder, who all played extremely well and came close on multiple occasions to scoring their first goals.  After losing eight players to graduation, the Bombers took a squad of 13 players to the South Okanagan.LVR started the tournament slowly against G.W. Graham, but once the players got their game legs, the Bombers took over the contest.Noa Butterfield and Emma Borhi scored for LVR in a 2-0 win.LVR then edged South Kamloops 1-0 on a goal by Hanna Quinn.Saturday, LVR got the offence going to down Mt. Boucherie 3-1.Allie Zondervan, Naomi Perkins, with a pair, scored for the Bombers.The Bombers then defeated Agassiz 3-0 on pair of goals by Quinn and a single by Borhi.The Bombers return to the pitch Thursday at Pass Creek in Castlegar when LVR meets Stanley Humphries Rockers at 4 p.m.last_img read more

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Mallard’s Team of the Week — Nelson Neptunes Swim Team

first_imgMallard’s Source for sports is very impressed with the Neptunes overcoming adversity and wants to praise the swimmers with Team of the Week.For more information regarding the Neptunes program check out the club’s website. It doesn’t matter that the Nelson Neptunes Swim Team is minus a home.The show will go on for the Kootenay Summer Swim Association team the Neptunes open the training season May 1 swimming five times a week at the Castlegar Aquatic Centre.After May, the Neptunes move home base to the Salmo outdoor pool for June, July and August as well as hosting a meet in June in Salmo.last_img

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