July, 2019 Archive

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Work and pensions ministers have been accused of a

first_imgWork and pensions ministers have been accused of another attempt to avoid improving the safety of its “fitness for work” test for benefit claimants with mental health conditions.A year after ministers told a tribunal – following a lengthy judicial review – that it would test ways to make the work capability assessment (WCA) safer by collecting medical evidence about each claimant from their doctor and psychiatrist, the promised pilot project has still not been launched.DWP’s efforts to avoid taking steps to improve the safety of the WCA – by ensuring that all the necessary evidence is gathered before a decision on a claim for out-of-work disability benefits is taken – stretch back all the way to April 2010.Six years ago, coroner Tom Osborne wrote to DWP to express concerns that it did not automatically seek further medical evidence from a claimant’s GP or psychiatrist if they had a mental health condition, following an inquest into the death of Stephen Carré in January 2010.DWP finally unearthed a draft response to Osborne’s letter last month, but it has all but admitted that it was never sent to the coroner.Four years later, in 2014, another letter was sent to DWP by a coroner, raising the same concerns and making almost identical recommendations, this time following the death of Michael O’Sullivan, from north London.And almost exactly one year ago today, after the upper tribunal administrative appeals chamber ruled that the WCA discriminated against some people with mental health conditions, DWP promised to work with Maximus – the discredited US outsourcing giant that had just taken over the WCA contract from Atos – to develop a pilot programme to test new ways of collecting further medical evidence.But that pilot project has still not begun.In January, DWP told lawyers from The Public Law Project, who represented the two claimants who took the judicial review case, that it had been working with Maximus on a “feasibility study”, which had to be completed before the work could begin.A spokeswoman for the Mental Health Resistance Network, which was behind the judicial review which tribunal case, said the aim of the pilot project would be to find a “reasonable” way to remedy the discrimination faced by claimants with mental health conditions.But she said: “All we are getting back is ‘they are in discussion, they are in discussion.’”The network is planning a campaign to demand that if and when DWP eventually launches the pilot project, the government is completely transparent in how it is carried out.But the MHRN spokeswoman said she feared the government would conduct the pilot in such a way that would make it look as if gathering further medical evidence was an “unreasonable” adjustment to make under the Equality Act.She also said she was “shocked and disgusted” that DWP had never informed their lawyers about the existence of the Stephen Carré coroner’s letter, or – later on in the case – the Michael O’Sullivan letter.She said: “They withheld very significant evidence from that court case.”DWP repeatedly refused this week to confirm that the pilot project has yet to start.A DWP spokesman said the government began work with Maximus in December to “develop new and better processes for people with mental health conditions”.When DNS asked for further clarity, he then added: “We started testing new processes with [Maximus] in December. “We will analyse the findings once we’ve completed this work and then make a decision concerning the next steps.”When DNS asked again whether this meant the pilot project had not begun, he said: “The testing is a key part of this process, which is currently on-going.”DNS asked yet again whether this meant that the pilot had not yet started, he said: “As previously stated, work has already begun on this with initial testing starting in December.”But DNS has since seen a letter from a DWP lawyer to The Public Law Project, which states that the work that began in December related to “a small-scale feasibility test” and not the “larger-scale pilot”.This letter states that the test is “likely to take three to four months, following which the result will be evaluated and the learning and improvements suggested by the feasibility test will be incorporated into the proposed process to be tested in a larger-scale pilot”.last_img read more

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A train company that has received more than £100 m

first_imgA train company that has received more than £100 million in public subsidies to pay for new carriages for a sleeper service from Scotland to London has failed to provide any accessible on-board showers, even though it is providing such facilities for non-disabled people.The Scottishgovernment contributed £60 million towards the replacement of the CaledonianSleeper fleet, while the UK government has provided another £50 million.CaledonianSleeper has put the cost of the new fleet at £150 million, while the Scottishgovernment – through its transport agency Transport Scotland – claims it cost£120 million.ButCaledonian Sleeper, which is run by the outsourcing company Serco, hasconfirmed that while the new fleet includes cabins with ensuite showers andtoilets, none of the wheelchair-accessible cabins have such facilities.And althoughthe carriages include accessible toilets, none of them offer accessible showerseither.This meansthat any wheelchair-user who wants to take a shower is likely to have to do soin a train station instead.The newservice launched last week between London Euston and Glasgow Central orEdinburgh Waverley, and will be followed later this year with a route between Londonand Aberdeen, Inverness and Fort William.Accessibletransport campaigner Doug Paulley said the failure to provide accessibleshowers made him “very angry and very sad”.He said hebelieved the use of public money on the project meant the UK and Scottishgovernment were breaching their public sector equality duty (PSED) under theEquality Act.He said: “Itstrikes me that accessible showers would be considerably more important fordisabled people than for non-disabled.“It is agreat shame that the vehicles don’t include accessible showers, and retrofittingthem seems unlikely. “Perhaps thevehicles will be in use for 40 years, like the old sleepers were.”Thecarriages themselves probably meet the technical requirements for railaccessibility, so the company itself is unlikely to be guilty of discriminationunder the act, said Paulley.But headded: “I don’t see how investing £110 million of tax-payers’ money in stockthat has facilities for non-disabled people to have showers but not disabledpeople meets the requirements of the public bodies involved under the PSED.”Paulley hastried to discover what discussions took place about including accessibleshowers through a freedom of information request.He told the Scottishgovernment: “Many disabled people’s impairments, including mine, mean that theyneed showers more than non-disabled people. “The sameimpairments mean that it is much more effort to use showers in stations – gettingdressed and undressed, and dried and all the rest of it, is a massive effort,logistically and otherwise. “Goingdirect from bed to a shower then back onto the bed to get dried and undressedcuts out so much of this.”But he wastold the Scottish government holds no information on discussions about whetheraccessible showers could be installed.Among othercampaigners who have raised concerns about the lack of accessible showers isBaroness [Tanni] Grey-Thompson, who said it meant disabled people did not havethe same choices as non-disabled people. And “JellyHead”, who tweets at @LordOrk, said: “Let’s not forget these new trains will bein service for decades so consequently disabled people will be disadvantagedlong into the future which simply isn’t morally reasonable or acceptable.” Even thoughthe UK government contributed £50 million towards the project, the Department forTransport has refused to answer questions about the lack of accessible showersor its own PSED legal duties.TransportScotland has refused to say whether it ever considered the need for accessibleshowers or had any discussions with Caledonian Sleeper about the possibility,despite investing £60 million into the programme.It said thedecision for leasing and ordering the trains “rests wholly with Serco” butrefused – despite repeated requests from Disability News Service – to saywhether it ever discussed the issue of accessible showers. A TransportScotland spokesperson added: “All accessible rooms are located directly besidethe accessible toilets.  “Weunderstand the option to include accessible showers was declined based onsafety grounds but we do not hold the details.”She added:“We don’t believe that Transport Scotland is in a breach of its public sectorequality duty.”A spokesperson for Serco Caledonian Sleeper said the company had not beenable to “find a safe or acceptable way” to provide accessible showers on boardthe train.Magnus Conn, new trains programme director for Serco Caledonian Sleeper, claimed the company had “worked extensivelywith accessibility experts to investigate all options and develop an offeringthat goes above and beyond while complying with relevant legislation” and had “soughtto ensure the best experience possible for disabled users”.The price of an accessible room on the service includes the use of accessible showers at the company’s own first class lounges at Dundee, Inverness, Fort William, Leuchars, Perth and Stirling, and to shower facilities run by other rail providers at London Euston, Glasgow Central, Edinburgh Waverley and Aberdeen.Picture: Scottish secretary David Mundell (second from right) at the launch of the new serviceA note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more

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Talk of the Mission A New Mona Caron Mural on 21st Street

first_imgMona Caron at work. Photo by Elizabeth CreelyIt isn’t clear that the Muzios’ owned the building, though; perhaps they were customers of the Superba Packing Company, Ltd., a food manufactory specializing in canned food, a firm so confident of the future of prepared food that it sponsored an exhibition kitchen at the Golden Gate International Exposition, held on Treasure Island from 1939 to 1940.Two pages from the Treasure Island Brochure.There’s no evidence now of the building’s foodie past, save for the barely discernible lettering on the façade. What was the theme of the mural or the name? Fiduccia didn’t know, but was looking forward to being pleasantly surprised. “We wanted some kind of bike theme. We discussed it a bit and let her run with it. She said something about pedals and plants representing growth.” He looked pensive. “Maybe we should think about a name.”The mural, which is likely to be finished sometime in mid-December, is currently in its blue period: delft, sky, and cobalt blue mostly. “It won’t stay this way,” Caron told me. “The colors will be tweaked. It’s going to be a complicated color scheme when it’s done. Part of me really likes the drama of painting in a public space. People want to know what it will look like and I want them to wait!” She smiled as she daubed colors onto the wall. “I want them to be surprised.”Mona Caron at work. Photo by Elizabeth CreelyCaron’s murals usually carry some narrative with them, but that wasn’t the case with this mural. “This is not going to be as deeply layered as some of my other murals. This mural is going to celebrate the role of Pedal Revolution in the neighborhood. I want to show the goodness kind of exploding.“Everything is centered around the big garage door,” she said gesturing toward the door at the entrance of the shop. “There will be a scattering of bright petals near the ground.” Then she laughed. “I guess I just told you what it will look like! It’s going to be a happy mural for a change.”Caron’s murals are never unhappy: thought-provoking maybe, but never grim, and fairly upbeat about the resilience of the natural world. Rather than referencing the end of civilization, she depicts a successfully reclaimed future. In it, “spontaneous urban vegetation” produces dandelions, nettles, and fireweed that uproot the concrete barrens of cities and transform urban spaces into livable commons. “All of my murals have so much story in them, so much narrative. Here, the place itself is the story and I’m just adding an exclamation point.”She carefully painted the petal of what looked like a large dahlia with cornflower blue paint. It had been one week and one day since America elected Donald Trump as President. Was it helpful to paint murals during a time of political upheaval? “It’s work. But it’s nice to do something outdoors, with your hands and get lost in it.”She stroked the blue over the surface, put down the brush and picked up another, which she used to outline the petal with a cobalt-blue border. “It’s good to do something happy and celebratory in gloomy times.”Mona Caron at work. Photo by Elizabeth CreelyPhoto by Elizabeth Creely On Wednesday, November 16th, Mona Caron, the muralist whose work graces walls from Bolivia to Noe Valley, was up on some scaffolding painting a mural, her eighth in San Francisco, for Pedal Revolution, the bike shop at 3085 21st St. that doubles as a nonprofit job training program for youth. It was a cold day, with a sharp wind blowing from the north. Caron’s abundant brown hair was stuffed under a knit cap, and her nose was red. “It’s so cold!” she exclaimed. “And my nose keeps running!”Pedal Revolution provides basic job skills for “disconnected” youth. “We don’t use the term at-risk,” said Steve Fiduccia, the general manager. “Some of them have no contact with their family and some are homeless.”Pedal Revolution and New Ventures, the parent nonprofit, take in about 100 interns every year who need training in the basics: résumé building, time management and other skills. “You gotta show up to work on time,” observed Fiduccia. “We’re not trying to turn out a lot of bike mechanics; we’re trying to get them to be employable, so that they can get jobs.”Pedal Revolution is housed in a Mission style revival building, built in 1921. The exterior needed a bit of prep work, which uncovered some historic detail: a trade name, which was hard to see, under the scaffolding. “Mona liked that there was some of that detail on the building,” Fiduccia told me. “We think it was owned by a man named Muzio. It’s the name of the guy who used to own the liquor store across the street. We think he owned this building as well.” 0%center_img Tags: murals Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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SF Mission Artist Pushes for Growth in Shrinking Art World

first_imgEven on a weekday morning over coffee, Bernadette Bohan looks like she just stepped out of a Warhol painting. With red lipstick expertly applied and wearing leggings printed with an image of her own staggeringly bright collage artwork, she’s taking no prisoners, and this isn’t even her evening look. At 45, Bohan is ready to bust out of starving artist mode and into her career – but unlike many career-focused women, she’s determined to bring up other artists around her too. “She’s always wanted to be this person who wants to showcase other people’s work as well as showcase her own work,” said Cynthia Boedihardjo, who runs an arts space on 26th Street called The Laundry. Boedihardjo and a group of co-owners acquired the space, then a laundromat, in 2013. Over three years, they built it up into an events and exhibition space, and recently added a cafe to the front. As the Laundry began tentatively opening its doors to the community, Bohan was quickly on the scene, offering to do a trunk show there. 0% More recently, Bohan’s solo show there began with a full-on party, which the artist emceed and used as an opportunity to get her friends gigs, too. “This was her solo exhibition, but at the back of her mind was, okay, how do I promote other people that are also in the arts space, and also struggling, and let them have their space for the five to ten minutes that I’m providing them?” Boedihardjo said. That’s trademark Bohan, according to friends. When she decided to try and live as an artist in San Francisco 25 years ago, Bohan said, it seemed like a town, a place where you could make it. But it was also clear that there was a flourishing arts scene.After having to leave a raucous artist live/work space at 9th and Folsom streets about eight years ago, Bohan found a building on 21st and Florida streets that had once produced boxes. Inspired by the space she had just left, planned out an arts space.“I wanted to do more community stuff and was less focused on my own art and more into collaborating with other people,” she said. Bohan now has her living quarters in the area of the building that used to be the shipping and receiving department. A large open area is made available as space for whoever needs it, from visual artists to bands that need practice space. Often, using the space is free or paid with barter. The space, which recently passed muster during a citywide crackdown on warehouse-turned-arts spaces, is also what keeps her afloat thanks to rent control, and provides a low-cost workspace to others.Bohan called it The Box Factory – in part because it was literally that, but the name is also a play on the slang term for women’s genitalia and Andy Warhol’s Factory.Art by Bernadette Bohan. Photo by Laura WenusNot content to be simply a mixed media artist and run an artist space, plays in a band, emcees and hosts concerts, and started a radio program called Late Night Bubbles on Radio Valencia about a year ago. On it, she frequently hosts drag queens and other queer personalities. Shortly after she learned the ropes at Radio Valencia, said station manager Steve Courtney, she put on a fundraiser for the station.“I used to deal with a lot more people who did things, movers and shakers, people who coined the term makers, people in San Francisco used to doing shit. And she’s definitely one of those people,” Courtney said. “She seems to burn with a certain degree of fire and internal energy.”That passion is evident in Bohan’s goals.“I’m still determined as fuck,” she said. “I’m sticking it out…I have this dream that I’m pursuing. I don’t want the house and the dog and the bullshit. I’m 45 and I don’t want to give up on my dream.”Bohan said a pivotal moment for her was when she went to the Board of Supervisors in July last year to speak in favor of the DaDa art bar moving into the Mechanic’s Institute, to the dismay of its would-be neighbors who feared noise. Drag queens and artists dressed up to give their statements to the city to defend the bar, she said – and prevailed.“There are still artists here, and it’s not fair that we have nowhere to go,” she said. At that point, she decided, “I’m putting a new stake in the ground. We can’t do this anymore.”That means staying in the know, keeping up with the latest movements in the art world, and, yes, taking side jobs. Trained as an English teacher, Bohan does freelance creative work, has worked as a barista, as massage therapist and holistic healer, and has established an active bartering network that keeps her space properly equipped.Her art, too is about reinvention and seeing things a new way. Her current series on display at The Laundry features vibrant collections of repurposed children’s toys. Much of the materials are sourced from thrift store or other places where people deposit their unwanted, used up belongings. “The aspect of upcycled toys or donated toys, and her trying to discuss the topics of trash people throwing things away even though they’re brand new, and just having people look at that and have a conversation about it really spoke to me,” Boedihardjo said of the art.Through the lens of these discarded toys and materials, and especially with color, Bohan also explores gender and how gender roles are enforced. The pieces are interactive, Boedihardjo noted, allowing and even inviting the viewer to touch, to play – one piece, for example, includes a mirror. Another, during one mid-January visit, sported a large gap where someone had pulled off an element. Reaching people is part of the reason Bohan is so stubborn about walking the artist path.“I can reach many more people through my art than I could teaching in a classroom,” Bohan said. To carry on the artist’s torch in gentrifying San Francisco, Bohan said, one must be in the know. She knows who’s who in local politics, she knows who to talk to to put on events. “She’s definitely the kind of person who’s keeping that San Francisco alive,” Courtney said.  Bernadette Bohan’s show will close at The Laundry on Saturday, March 4 with jazz and performances. center_img Tags: arts • Events • things to do Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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Little Mission Studio Launches Concert Series with Big Picture Vision

first_img 0% Tags: Events • immigration • Music • things to do Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% The studio’s owners started thinking about what they could put together to respond to the political situation around the time of the first travel ban order was issued, Rupert said. Violin and viola instructor Mia Nardi-Huffman started a Music for Resistance group, to overwhelming enthusiasm from the Little Mission Studio community. They began reaching out to fellow musicians to come up with a concert series meant to shine a spotlight on social causes and donate to organizations engaging with those causes. “I definitely think musicians and artists have a responsibility to react to what’s happening around them and participate,” Rupert said.Responding to a travel ban by highlighting the musical achievements of immigrants strikes a clear note of resistance, but the series is also about building empathy.“I think that’s a really important part of art in general, of creating art,” Plumb said. “So other people can relate to an experience someone else is having and basically tell them that they are with them, that they’re not alone. That they’re not the only one that is struggling or that they are being seen.”That means both giving composers, musicians, and performers exposure, in the sense that their work is being literally seen and heard. But it also expresses solidarity in a more intimate way.“I think that’s one of the more important things that we’re trying to do with the concert series, is showing people that we see them,” Plumb explains, “And that a lot of the things that are happening are not things that are okay.”The UnRest series begins Saturday, March 18th at 8 p.m. In lieu of a ticket price, a suggested donation is set at $15. Proceeds will benefit the ACLU. The series is meant to highlight the works of refugees, women, people of color, LGBTQ people, immigrants and other groups who have been maligned by the new president. “Without contributions from these people, it would be a very much less rich art form,” Rupert points out. He’ll be playing, among other things, a piece by Syrian refugee Suad Bushnaq in the concert.  “Perhaps if this particular composer did not escape Syria, this work would not exist,” he said.Other pieces in the concert include a selection of Balkan Miniatures, traditional Armenian and Syrian melodies, as well as music by Chopin, who was unable to return to his native Poland because of conflict with Russia. Music samples in this story are played and recorded by Matt Rupert from a theme and variations called Aubada composed by Suad Bushnaq.Inside a music center called “Little Mission Studio” on a semi-industrial block of Hampshire Street, proprietors Claire Plumb and Matt Rupert are exploring big themes. Their upcoming concert series, UnRest, takes direct aim at the narratives of fear and protectionism emanating from the nation’s capitol.It’s musical response, which starts on Saturday March 18, is to feature works of those most derided by the the Trump Administration. “We feel that music, and teaching music and performing music, [have] inherently community building and community gathering aspects,” Rupert said. “So it’s important for us to be involved in our community in that way.”last_img read more

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A FANTASTIC second half comeback was just not enou

first_imgA FANTASTIC second half comeback was just not enough as Saints were edged out 18-12 in the Carnegie Challenge Cup Semi Final.Two tries in three minutes had Saints facing down a 16 point deficit but they rallied with a brace of their own to set up a grandstand finale.But they had left themselves too much to do at the end and despite some heroics from the busted up James Graham and James Roby Wigan reached their first Wembley final in 13 years.A tight first half saw Saints 6-2 down despite having the majority of ball, pressure and territory.Repeat sets, three forced drop outs but only one Jamie Foster goal told the story of chances lost… before Wigan converted their only one through George Carmont after Josh Charnley’s break was felled by Paul Wellens.In the second half, Saints had yet more pressure without a cutting edge and Wigan punished them as Charnley found space down the right.Sam Tomkins added another seconds later but Saints hit back through Francis Meli’s mazy run which saw Foster go over in the corner.Foster then grabbed his second as Leon Pryce and Paul Wellens cut the Wigan defence to shreds.But the clock ran down on their final hopes and they couldn’t find the killer last play to see off their old rivals.Team news centred on the return of Francis Meli and Sia Soliola after they missed last week’s game at Castleford through injury.Tony Puletua moved into the front row – leaving Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook to come off the bench and provide impact.Paul Clough also returned but there was no room for Kyle Eastmond who had a hamstring injury.Wigan named a predicted side – the only surprise Gareth Hock being left out.Jamie Foster got the match underway in a raucous atmosphere.Both sides exchanged penalties and Saints could have opened the scoring only for Josh Charnley to intercept Francis Meli’s pass to Foster.Saints then had three sets on Wigan’s line but couldn’t find a way through.Meli and Foster then had another chance to combine but the ball went to ground.Pat Richards missed a simple chance in front of goal to put Wigan two to the good on 15 minutes but Jamie Foster didn’t miss his opportunity five minutes later.Saints had had the majority of ball and pressure but couldn’t make it pay.And when Wigan scored from their own try line it underlined the fact they needed to take their chances.A great kick had Sam Tomkins struggling just over his own try line – but Josh Charnley broke down the field only to be felled by a superb Paul Wellens tackle.But the damage was done and as the ball came left through hands George Carmont cut inside Tom Makinson.Richards with the conversion.Half Time: Saints 2 Wigan 6Saints began the second half on the front foot but Lomax’ cheeky break from James Roby’s pass wasn’t punished as it should have been.And on only their second real chance of the game Wigan seemingly went further ahead.They won an unexpected scrum even though they clearly knocked the ball forward and Sam Tomkins made it pay – showing all his strength to go over.But the video referee ruled it out for an obstruction by Ryan Hoffman.Saints almost hit back – but once again Wigan’s defence was too strong.Josh Charnley was next in for Wigan – using a gap on Saints’ left to outpace the cover defence.Sam Tomkins added Wigan’s third shortly after – thanks an appalling decision to give them head and feed at a scrum from the touch judge.But with 15 minutes left, Saints gave themselves a lifeline when they ran it on the last and Francis Meli cut Wigan apart to send in Foster.A couple of minutes later Saints forced a drop out and after a couple of thunderous drives Leon Pryce combined with Paul Wellens for Francis Meli to feed Foster once again.A staggering turnaround…Saints tried and toiled in the final stages to get over the line, but penalties went against them and they couldn’t get back into the Warriors’ territory.A sad end to a pulsating match – but Saints did themselves and their fans proud.Match Summary:Saints:Tries: Foster (2)Goals: Foster (2 from 3)Wigan:Tries: Carmont, Charnley, TomkinsGoals: Richards (3 from 5)Penalties:Saints: 10Wigan: 10HT: 2-6FT: 12-18REF: Richard SilverwoodATT: 12713Teams:Saints:1. Paul Wellens; 28. Thomas Makinson, 3. Michael Shenton, 5. Francis Meli, 22. Jamie Foster; 6. Leon Pryce, 20. Jonny Lomax; 10. James Graham, 9. James Roby, 11. Tony Puletua, 13. Chris Flannery, 4. Sia Soliola, 12. Jon Wilkin.Subs: 14. Scott Moore, 15. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 16. Paul Clough, 25. Lee Gaskell.Wigan:1. Sam Tomkins; 25. Josh Charnley, 12. Joel Tomkins, 4. George Carmont, 5. Pat Richards; 17. Brett Finch, 6. Paul Deacon; 15. Jeff Lima, 7. Thomas Leuluai, 10. Andy Coley, 11. Harrison Hansen, 16. Ryan Hoffman, 13. Sean O’Loughlin.Subs: 9. Michael McIlorum, 21. Lee Mossop, 22. Liam Farrell, 35. Ben Cross.last_img read more

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KEIRON Cunningham says Saints to treat every game

first_imgKEIRON Cunningham says Saints to treat every game like a Grand Final as they aim to close the gap on the top four.Two wins on the bounce have pulled his side to within four points – and another this Friday would heap pressure on those above them.“We’ve had two wins on the run but we know we have to do more,” he said. “For the final 50 minutes against Hull KR we produced a really professional performance.“Wakefield away is always a tough game and history tells you there is usually plenty of points whenever we go there. We did enough to keep our noses in front but we also did our best to hurt ourselves at times.“You have admire the resilience of the team to keep nudging in front. We got a 12 point buffer and if we had got another try we would have blown the game up.“Credit to Wakefield though, they played well and had a real dig. It was a big game for them to secure the 8 and we knew it would be big for us as well.”He continued: “We had some really good performances and I was glad that Greg (Richards) picked up a try. It was good to see him finally get one. It has been a long time coming for him.“He tries hard every week and you could tell how much it meant to everyone. When he scored all the players ran in to celebrate with him. He was one of our standout front rowers and gave us a really good opener.“Hopefully, he will get some more now.”Saints face Widnes in a local derby this Friday – and games between the two are usually high scoring, exciting affairs.“Widnes are playing some good footy,” Keiron continued. “They were narrowly beaten by Wigan in a game they should have won and their second half performance in the cup quarter final should have seen them through.“Last weekend they beat Leeds in a closely fought encounter. It was a tough game and both sides played pretty well. They are in a rich vein of form and have impressed me this season.“When we won over there we had to play really well to get the game. Both their hookers are having a lot of influence. We know what we are going to face so we have to focus on what we can do and what we have to do.“We have three really tough games on our hands coming up but we can’t look further than Friday. We have to treat every game like a Grand Final.“I think the top eight is done now and all teams are doing is jostling for positions. We have made up two points on the top four and there are lots of games left. Everything is up for grabs and I don’t think there will be a lot of points in it at the end.”Adam Swift has been ruled out for the match whilst Dominique Peyroux will also be missing.Luke Walsh could return but KC wouldn’t be drawn on whether it was a definite.“We haven’t got a lot of time on the field this week, but we will get him through and see where he is at,” he said.Tickets for Friday’s game with Widnes are on sale from the Ticket Office, by calling 01744 455 052 or by logging on here.last_img read more

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It features a great selection of player action ima

first_imgIt features a great selection of player action images from the 2017 season and is a great gift idea.It is the ideal way to show your love for Saints in any bedroom, kitchen or office.Each page contains at least one action shot, plus there is space on each day to put in reminders or key dates.You can buy yours at the Saints Superstore for £7.99, or check it out online here.last_img

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Leland Police searching for car thief suspects

first_imgLELAND, NC (WWAY) — Leland Police are searching for the man and woman accused of stealing a town vehicle.Police say it happened on September 17 just before 9:30 a.m.- Advertisement – Police say the vehicle was stolen from Hunterstone Drive in Leland and was found later that day, around 4:30 p.m.,  in Winston Salem.If you recognize the couple in the photo, contact Det. McCabe at (910) 332-5005.last_img

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WPD charge two Florida men in international scheme to defraud Belk

first_img (Photo: Monique Robinson) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — A scheme involving items bought at Belk department stores using stolen bank account information and then sold on the black market came to an end in Wilmington.Wilmington Police arrested Henrique Teixeira Mendes De Almeida, 29, and Gustavo Teixeira Mendes De Almedia, 34, and charged them with 21 counts of forgery of instrument and one count obtaining property by false pretense.- Advertisement – According to a news release from Wilmington Police, a notice with the Almeidas’s pictures was circulated to Belk employees earlier this month. A loss prevention officer with the Belk inside Independence Mall recognized the men from that notice and called 911.The Almeidas were then seen at the Belk in Mayfaire, where officers apprehended them. (Photo: Monique Robinson) (Photo: Monique Robinson)center_img (Photo: Monique Robinson) 1 of 4 During a search of the rental car driven by the duo, officers found 94 credit cards, 102 Belk gift cards worth $300 each, dozens of Belk merchandise, a card scanning device, and an address list for every Belk in the South East, many of which had marks beside them denoting they had been visited.Related Article: Kelly lawyer: New charge may be from old caseThe men also had numerous passports from different countries and other forms of ID with different names and information.Although the credit cards were in their names, the magnetic strips correlated to stolen bank account information across the world.The pair would use the stolen card information to purchase gift cards at Belk, then they would use the gift cards to purchase merchandise. They would then ship the merchandise to a home in Coral Springs, Florida, where they would sell it internationally on the black market.WPD was assisted by the United States Secret Service, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Immigrations Customs & Enforcement, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department and the Coral Springs Police Departmentlast_img read more

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