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Job Vacancy: Goods Dispatch/Accounts Administrator required

first_imgJob Vacancy: Green Pastures Convoy require a Goods Dispatch/Accounts Administrator. This is a permanent full time role. The successful candidate will report to the Financial Controller.Duties include but not limited to: Daily sales invoicing and PO administrationPayroll processing and monitoring annual leave requestsPreparing sales reports weeklyMaintaining stock recordsPreparation of payment runs for ManagementRevenue and CSO returnsPreparation of multi-currency bank reconciliations and debtors analysisMaintain company policies and employee informationOther analytical / reconciliation work as requiredGeneral administrationExperience:Exposure to fast paced officeKnowledge of goods dispatch and sales order processing desirable but not necessaryKnowledge of SAGE desirable but not necessaryProficient in Microsoft Office, including Word and ExcelStrong IT skillsProcessing/data entry experienceReconciliation & reporting experienceExperience in a similar role and/or in a Production environment an advantagePerson Spec:Ability to multi-task, prioritise work and work on their own initiativeStrong attention to detail is essentialStrong communication, organisational and time management skills Please forward CVs to emer.odonnell@greenpasturesdonegal.com Job Vacancy: Goods Dispatch/Accounts Administrator required was last modified: March 1st, 2018 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:green pastures donegaljobVacancylast_img read more

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Sportsday Podcast on talkSPORT 2: June 2, 2017

first_imgThis Friday morning on Sportsday we bring you your essential round-up of the morning’s top sports stories.last_img

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ANGER AS CREEPER BURGLARS STRIKE AGAIN IN WEEK-LONG THEFT SPREE

first_imgExclusive: CRAZED burglars with no regard for human life or their property have struck again in Co Donegal – this time robbing tourists and burning out their car.Donegal Daily understands this is just the latest break-in after a series of similar incidents in the same area of the county where several elderly people were robbed in February.This time families from County Wexford on an Easter break and staying in Raphoe awoke to find the house they were staying in at McBride street had been raided. The thieves then stole the family jeep for their getaway – and then burned it out in Convoy.A series of other break-ins have taken part in east Donegal in recent days.One home owner in Ard Na Meala in St Johnston managed to disturb burglars who fled the scene empty handed.Cllr Frank McBrearty condemned the latest incident as “outrageous.” He told Donegal Daily: “Families living in this county and now tourists visiting this county are being robbed day and daily.“Serious questions now need to be asked about policing in this area and how resources are being used.“There have been at least 30 incidents since the start of the year and people have had enough.”There have been reports of thefts elsewhere in east Donegal this week. ANGER AS CREEPER BURGLARS STRIKE AGAIN IN WEEK-LONG THEFT SPREE was last modified: April 26th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:burglarscreeper burglarsdonegalRaphoeSt JohnstontheftWexfordlast_img read more

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Half a million euro awarded to Donegal youth clubs

first_imgMajor funding has been granted to Donegal youth groups under the Local Youth Club Equipment Scheme with scout groups, music groups and youth clubs among those benefitting.The Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Dr Katherine Zappone, has granted €6.35m to 1,600 youth projects and groups across the country.Donegal benefitted from more than half a million euro in funds being awarded to 100 youth projects across the county. The Scheme was developed to support the work of volunteers, to enhance the experience of members, and to provide vital equipment to local youth clubs and groups.Government Chief Whip Joe McHugh comments: “This funding will be a great benefit to youth clubs and youth projects here in Donegal over the coming year. The Scheme is administered through the Donegal ETB with each group asking their members to come up with a list of equipment they wanted.“I want to give a big thank you to everyone involved with these very important projects locally. The volunteering you do is of enormous benefit to the entire community,” the Fine Gael TD said. “I also want to thank Minister Zappone who has done enormous work for Donegal again this year.”Minister Zappone said: “What made this scheme unique was that clubs were asked to consult with the young people themselves to ascertain their opinions on what equipment should be applied for. “It was a key feature of the scheme that any equipment applied for must directly benefit the members of the youth club or group.”Details on the Donegal groups:Half a million euro awarded to Donegal youth clubs was last modified: December 16th, 2017 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Katherine Zapponelocal youth club equipment schemeyouth clubslast_img read more

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Ferrostaal to invest R1.8bn in SA

first_img17 October 2005German industrial group MAN Ferrostaal is to make two major investments in South Africa, together worth about R1.8-billion, Business Day reports.According to Business Day, Ferrostaal will invest in a stainless steel precision strip mill at Coega in the Eastern Cape and an oil rig manufacturing plant at Saldanha Bay in the Western Cape.The investments will be made in fulfilment of the company’s “offset” obligations under the SA government’s industrial participation programme, which requires any multinational company that wins a government tender worth more than US$10-million to spend roughly 30% of the value of the contract on local investment.In terms of the offset programme, major arms contractors, including Ferrostaal, are committed to investing US$4-billion in South Africa in return for arms deal contracts.According to Business Day, $1.5-billion of this has been committed and invested so far.The newspaper reports that Ferrostaal has approved a €80-million (R640-million) investment for the first phase of a stainless steel precision strip mill at Coega’s industrial development zone, with €120-million (R960-million) envisioned in a second phase.And last week, Business Day reports, the company presented the SA government with details of a R200-million oil rig manufacturing plant at Saldanha Bay and a repair facility in Cape Town harbour.Both projects are expected to get under way in March 2006.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

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Birthday wishes pour in for Mandela

first_img18 July 2008Messages of congratulations, tributes and good wishes are pouring in from home and abroad, from ordinary people and influential leaders alike, for former South African president Nelson Mandela on his 90th birthday.President Thabo Mbeki extended his message on behalf of the entire nation to the internationally revered statesman and former political prisoner on Friday.“We are proud as South Africans that Mr Mandela and his generation of fighters embraced with both passion and reason the mission that history imposed on them and more than met the demands that it enjoined them to fulfil,” he said in Pretoria on Friday.Mbeki said South Africans glowed in the light of fame because the country stood on the shoulders of icons such as Mandela.Harmony and equalityHe recalled Mandela’s statement at the opening of the defence case in the Rivonia Trial in the Pretoria Supreme Court on 20 April 1964: “I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities,” Mandela said back then.“It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”Mbeki urged the current generation to return to the question of their mission and how to fulfil it, as conditions and circumstances evolved, much in the same way that Mandela’s generation had to discover and fulfil its mission.“Finding answers to this question simultaneously as we celebrate his birthday is perhaps the biggest present we can give to Nelson Mandela,” said Mbeki. “Many happy returns – ukhule ukhokhobe!”An inspiration to allIn her birthday message to Mandela, Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka said he has been a true inspiration to her, to the country, its leaders, citizens and mostly, young South Africans.“He has lived true to the principle of ‘be the change you want to see in the world’,” Mlambo-Ngcuka said.Director General in the Office of the Presidency Frank Chikane said that as the first president of a non-racial, non-sexist and democratic South Africa, Mandela had laid a solid foundation for the emergence of democratic government that continued to serve the nation with pride.Apart from wishing Mandela on his birthday, Chikane said the Cabinet was also congratulating him on his 10th wedding anniversary.“You have left us a rich legacy from which government abundantly draws inspiration as it works for reconstruction and development, economic prosperity and national unity,” Chikane said. “Siyavuyisana nawe. Sikunqwenelela usuku olumnandi kunye nosapho lwakho, (We congratulate you. We wish you a happy birthday with your family), Happy Birthday Madiba.”An ‘icon of humanity’Fifa President Sepp Blatter also added the organisation’s message of good wishes, which includes a special birthday video message to pay tribute to Mandela, an “icon of humanity”, which will be aired by the South African Broadcasting Corporation and can also be viewed at the Fifa website.“Today, the football worldwide will celebrate the 90th birthday of Nelson Mandela, an extraordinary man who has dedicated his life to the promotion of human rights and democracy,” Blatter said.2010 Fifa World Cup Local Organising Committee CEO Danny Jordaan said the number “90” was usually synonymous with the beautiful game of football. “Today, however, the number 90 is synonymous with just one thing – Nelson Mandela turning the ripe old age of 90,” he said.Jordaan recalled how Mandela reacted when South Africa won the right to host the world cup. “With tears welling up in his eyes, Madiba declared that he ‘feels like a young man of fifteen’,” he said, adding “His has been a life of hardships, yet he showed no signs of bitterness, anger of hatred towards he captors who imprisoned him for 27 years.”Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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South Africa rises 7 places in annual WEF Global Competitiveness Index

first_imgSouth Africa rises seven places from 56 to 49 out of 140 countries according to the World Economic Forum’s annual Global Competitiveness Index. (Image: WEF)Johannesburg, Wednesday 30 September 2015 – Brand South Africa today welcomed the 2015/16 results of the World Economic Forum’s annual Global Competitiveness Index which sees South Africa rise seven places from 56 to 49 of 140 countries.Speaking about South Africa’s significantly improved performance in the Global Competitiveness Index, Brand South Africa’s CEO Kingsley Makhubela said, “Building a country’s competitiveness is a collective endevour involving the collaboration of government, business and civil society. Ultimately it involves all South Africans to coalesce around this national objective.”“The results of the 2015/16 Global Competitiveness Index shows that South Africa has made significant improvements towards ensuring we are a globally competitive destination. The report resonates with our own assessment that we must work towards strengthening, amongst others, the education and health sectors to ensure our sustained competitiveness. The National Development Plan outlines the steps we need to take to achieve this.”“We thank all South Africans for your contribution to building South Africa’s competitiveness and look forward to further improvements in the next year,” concluded Mr Makhubela.South Africa’s achievements in the 2015/16 Global Competitiveness IndexPillarOverall 2015/162014/15Pillar 1: Institutions3836Pillar 2: Infrastructure6860Pillar 3: Macroeconomic environment8589Pillar 4: Health and primary education126132Pillar 5: Higher education and training8386Pillar 6: Goods market efficiency3832Pillar 7: Labour market efficiency107113Pillar 8: Financial market development127Pillar 9: Technological readiness5066Pillar 10: Market size2925Pillar 11: Business sophistication3331Pillar 12: Innovation3843South Africa’s biggest improvements come in the areas of: health and primary education (up 6 places), labour market efficiency (up 6 places), technological readiness (up 16 places), and innovation (up 5 places).South Africa has also improved in the areas of: macro-economic environment (up 4 places), higher education and training (up 3 places), and business sophistication (up 2 places).South Africa has dropped in the area of infrastructure (down 8 places), institutions (down 2 places), goods market efficiency (down 6 places), financial market development (down 5 places) and market size (down 4 places).For more on the 2015/16 WEF Global Competitiveness Index, see the WEF site.last_img read more

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The Answer is Blowing in the Wind

first_imgOver the past few weeks, we’ve looked at a few power-generation technologies: pumped hydro, landfill gas, and nuclear. This week, we’ll examine another option that’s been in the news a lot over the past few years: wind power.Several decades ago a cousin and I became quite interested in wind energy. Like many renewable energy advocates in the late 1970s who were intrigued by the concept of generating electricity from the wind, we set out to find and refurbish an old wind turbine. We scoured the rural countryside in southeastern Alberta, a few hours east of his family’s ranch, and found a long-out-of-service Jacobs wind generator that the rancher was willing to let us have, along with the tower. With considerable effort—and, remarkably, not a single fatality—we got the three-blade turbine down and dismantled the steel tower. After we re-erected the tower, my cousin got pretty far along rebuilding the three-kilowatt Jacobs generator before we headed back to college or whatever we were up to at the time. We never got the job done—the empty tower still stands at the family ranch—but the effort helped instill in me a lifelong interest in wind energy.The history of using energy from the wind goes back thousands of years. Sailboats are generally considered the first use of wind power, though cooling buildings using natural ventilation might be considered an even earlier application. When we think about wind power, though, we usually focus on stationary windmills and wind turbines. The first windmills, as long ago as 500 A.D., relied on fabric sails turning a vertical shaft to pump water or grind grain.The Dutch shifted to a “horizontal-axis” windmill technology in the late 14th Century with their “tower mill” designs that became ubiquitous in the Dutch landscape.While some Dutch-type windmills were built in the U.S. for grinding grain, much smaller water-pumping windmills became far more common starting in the mid-19th Century. The multi-bladed water-pumpers were a familiar part of the rural American landscape, particularly in the plains states. As many as 6 million of these windmills pumped water from wells to fill livestock watering troughs and to irrigate farmland. Dempster Industries in Beatrice, Nebraska (founded in 1878) and Aermotor Windmill in San Angelo, Texas (founded in 1888) are still making these windmills for agricultural needs.With millions of water-pumping windmills dotting America’s farmland in the early 20th Century, a new application of wind power emerged: wind turbines used to generate electricity. The first electricity-generating wind turbine was produced by Charles Brush in Cleveland, Ohio in 1888. This was a large, cumbersome system with a multi-blade rotor over 50 feet in diameter that produced 12 kilowatts (kW) of electricity—just a fraction of what comparably sized wind turbines produce today.Dramatic advances were made both here and in Europe in the early 20th century, with blade designs that relied on aerodynamic lift—technology borrowed from airplanes. Jacobs Wind in Minneapolis, founded by brothers Joe and Marcellus Jacobs in 1927, sold more than 30,000 wind turbines to farm families through the 1950s. Jacobs’s three-blade wind turbines were mostly one to three kW in size, though the company later introduced 10- and 15-kW models. To give a sense of the value of electricity to a farm family in the 1920s and ’30s, Jacobs wind turbines sold for about $3,000 in 1930 dollars—a huge investment by today’s standards. Even more of the smaller, two-blade Wincharger wind turbines were sold during this period, though with the Rural Electrification program starting in the 1930s, sales of these gradually tapered off—until a resurgence of interest in renewable energy sources in the 1970s.Meanwhile, Vermont played a part in the development of larger, utility-scale wind turbines. In 1941, the world’s first wind turbine larger than one megawatt (MW) was built on Grandpa’s Knob in Castleton, Vermont. Designed by Palmer Putnam and manufactured by the S. Morgan Smith Company, this 175-foot-diameter, 1.25 MW wind turbine with two blades had just 1100 hours of run time before failing, and it would take almost 40 years before another wind turbine this large was built.Meanwhile, small wind turbines made a comeback beginning in the late 1970s and early ’80s, including by Enertech Corporation, a Norwich, Vermont company. The U.S. was the clear leader in wind power development in the early 1980s, but that technology leadership ended after President Reagan effectively terminated wind power research in the 1980s. Europeans took the lead, especially with development of large wind turbines that now dot the countryside in most European countries.Next week, we’ll take a look at state-of-the-art wind power, the development of large wind farms, and the promise (and limitations) of wind power for the future.last_img read more

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Designing a High-Performance Wall in Wildfire Country

first_imgWhere Does the Housewrap Go? Fine Homebuilding: Breaking the Thermal BridgeWall Sheathing OptionsHow to Design a WallThe Pros and Cons of Advanced FramingHow to Install Rigid Foam Sheathing Calculating the Minimum Thickness of Rigid Foam SheathingCalifornia Needs to Rethink Urban Fire RiskKingspan Kooltherm Phenolic Foam Rigid Insulation Installing Mineral Wool Insulation Over Exterior Wall Sheathing Lowering fire risksTim R. has another concern about adding a layer of exterior insulation: building details that could increase the risk of fire.“I would be concerned about the exterior insulation with the wood furring strip and possible gaps where embers could get in and ignite the plywood strips,” Tim explains. “The metal siding also needs its gaps filled to prevent ember intrusion.”Building codes for the Wildland-Urban Interface in San Diego County, California, might be useful, Tim says. And for extra protection, Welch could consider adding gypsum sheathing on the exterior of the walls to get a fire-rated wall assembly.Opaluch suggests that any wall or attic venting should include screens to prevent airborne embers from getting inside in the event of fire. Other tips: avoid using roof trusses because they are more vulnerable to fire; chose fiberglass window frames over vinyl window frames; consider mineral-wool insulated window shutters; and pay careful attention to landscaping practices that minimize fire risk. The closed-cell foam optionGBA editor Martin Holladay thinks that selecting exterior mineral wool rather than rigid foam makes sense if fire safety is high on Welch’s list or priorities.But the case for installing 2 inches of closed-cell spray polyurethane foam into wall cavities isn’t very strong because it would add only about R-5 to the total wall assembly compared to just using cellulose between the studs.Maybe so, Welch replies, but the foam also would have value as an air barrier — more so than the 2 inches of cellulose it would replace.As for locating the WRB, Holladay says it may be installed either between the plywood sheathing and the exterior mineral wool, or between the exterior mineral wool and the furring strips. He suggested that Welch consult a GBA article on this issue, “Where Does the Housewrap Go?”“The main factor that drives the decision on WRB location is the the integration of the WRB with your window flashing,” he says, “and that depends on whether your windows are innies or outies.” RELATED ARTICLES What about a double-stud wall?Would Welch’s choice of a 2×6 frame with exterior insulation really provide much more interior floor space than a double-stud wall? Some readers don’t think so.“Other considerations aside, the difference in depth of your two wall options are pretty close,” writes Malcolm Taylor. “[You’re comparing] a double-stud wall at around 12 inches and a 2×6 wall with 4 inches of exterior insulation at around 10 inches. You aren’t getting much more floor space with the mineral wool.”If losing too much interior space is a concern with a double-stud wall, Robert Opaluch adds, just increase the footprint of the foundation accordingly. Dimensions should be in multiples of 2 feet or 4 feet so the sheathing would line up with studs with less cutting.“I’ve been having the 2×6 vs. double-stud debate for months myself (it seems like an enduring one on this site and others),” Welch replies. “If I were to build a roughly 25′ x 80′ rectangular structure, a 12-inch double-stud would increase my foundation by 5%, and with the additional lumber, I think it would be more costly than a 2×6 wall with exterior insulation because the exterior insulation doesn’t require foundation underneath it, correct?“Some or all of the double-stud lumber cost would be offset by the cost of the exterior insulation, and the labor might be a wash if I can find a contractor with exterior insulation experience, but the double-stud foundation would cost me more,” he continues. “Is it just preference at this point (2×6 with exterior insulation vs. double-stud) or would one of these designs actually be more cost-effective with my cold climate and wildfire concerns?” Will Welch has chosen to build his high-performance house in Nederland, Colorado. The site is at the border of Climate Zones 6 and 7, and it poses some challenges: it’s at an elevation of 8,600 feet; the area gets a generous amount of snow and wind; and the number of heating degree days tops 8,800 a year.But Welch has one more concern: the threat of wildfires.“My priorities are a tight building envelope with high-R walls and more environmentally friendly materials that also resist fire, but I’m also trying to get the most bang for the buck on those materials,” Welch writes in a post at the Q&A forum.His plans currently call for a 2×6 framed wall rather than a double-stud wall, mainly as a way of preserving all the interior space he can. Wall cavities would be insulated with dense-packed cellulose or a mixture of closed-cell spray foam and cellulose, with 5/8-inch drywall on the inside and 5/8-inch plywood sheathing on the outside. On the exterior, Welch would use 4 inches of mineral wool insulation, covered with a mix of corrugated metal and fiber-cement siding.“I’m leaning away from rigid foams for the exterior insulation because a number of them either don’t perform well in fires or in the cold, have thermal drift over 5-10 years, or are rough on the environment,” Welch says. “That said, exterior mineral wool doesn’t look nearly as cost-effective as something like recycled rigid foam.”Welch has three questions:Is his choice of mineral wool over rigid foam reasonable?Given the climate, what is the best location for the water-resistive barrier (WRB)?Should he add 2 inches of closed-cell spray foam to the inside face of the wall sheathing to increase the wall’s R-value?That’s the topic for this Q&A Spotlight. Omitting exterior insulationContinuous exterior insulation is an effective way of reducing thermal bridging, but so is insulation on the interior, says Jon R., leaving just gypsum sheathing and siding on the exterior.“Exterior gypsum sheathing (no plywood) combined with double studs, continuous rigid foam on the interior side, or strips of polyiso rigid foam on the interior side studs addresses thermal bridging without flammable exterior furring,” Jon R. writes. “Strips are hard to beat on material cost and R-value per inch. If you do go with exterior insulation, the exterior furring strips could probably be treated to be more fire-resistant.”He refers Welch to an article by a builder named Stephen Bonfiglioli detailing his technique of adding strips of rigid foam to the inside edges of 2-by framing.If he were to choose that route, adds Taylor, Welch should plan on doing the work himself. “The labor component is too high to get a contractor involved,” he says. Some thoughts on advanced framingSome builders frame houses so that wall studs fall on 24-inch rather than 16-inch centers — one element of a framing method called “advanced framing.” This reduces the amount of thermal bridging, making for higher overall R-values by increasing the amount of wall cavity that can be devoted to insulation.But, suggests Roger Berry, proceed cautiously.“I would be very concerned with wind loading if not in a very protected spot,” he says. “My house grumbles in some of the 50+ mph gusts we get and my framing is rather tank-like. The idea of 24-inch framing may become more theory than reality once you have windows and doors placed. A plan with lots of free wall area might yield some gains against thermal bridging, but with exterior insulation I suspect the difference might pencil out to be quite trivial.”Finding a builder familiar with advanced framing techniques could prove to be a challenge, he adds, and the price difference between 5/8-inch sheathing and the more typical 1/2-inch sheathing for 16-inch on-center framing is probably worth considering. Further, 24-inch on-center framing may not meet requirements for the siding Welch uses.Berry also makes these suggestions:Check on fire insurance options now rather than later, and make certain that building details such as a sprinkler system or roof assembly will pass muster with insurers.A simple roof plan will minimize the number of “ember traps” regardless of roofing materials.Avoid 16-foot wide garage doors and use multiple smaller doors instead to reduce the risk that high winds will buckle the doors and allow burning embers inside the house.Buy the best windows you can afford, and if Welch must choose vinyl frames it would be best to avoid dark colors.A foam break to reduce thermal bridging will be more effective on the exterior than it would on the interior, and adding foam strips to the interior seems “very labor-intensive and fussy.” Our expert’s opinionPeter Yost, GBA’s technical director, added these thoughts:When I was at Building Science Corp., Steve Quarles of the University of California Berkeley Center for Fire Research and Outreach worked with us to integrate wildfire and moisture management strategies in buildings in areas prone to wildfire. It was really cool stuff. Quarles is now Chief Scientist for Wildfire and Durability with the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS). I gave him a call and asked for his recommendations for Will Welch’s home and any home in an area prone to wildfire. Here are the points he made:Get the Wildfire Partners designation available in Boulder County, Colorado. For new homes in Boulder County, there is really no difference between code compliance and the Wildfire Partners designation, but the designation can be helpful in obtaining fire insurance. Wildfire Partners, a program strongly recommended by Steve, works extensively with existing homes and businesses in wildfire-prone areas.Address structure and site equally. Wildfires often jump to structures as wind-blown brands or embers (see Image #2 below). You need both maximum defensible space around your home and structural defense, including simple designs, fire-resistant and heat-resistant materials, and fire-friendly construction details.Get the roof right; it is the most vulnerable part of the structure. Chose a simple design that creates the fewest pockets where debris can accumulate. The roof should have Class A cladding or be rated Class A by assembly. Class A claddings are materials like clay tiles. Standing-seam metal roofs can be Class A by assembly if rolled roofing is used under the standing-seam metal cladding. Finally, include closed, horizontal soffits. The roof framing is not the problem; it’s the places where embers and brands get purchase, such as open-framed eaves. Closed soffits provide less purchase, and closed horizontal soffits provide less purchase than sloped closed soffits.If you vent assemblies, use 16-gauge wire with a 1/8-inch grid and consider intumescent paint on vents. The more robust wire and smaller weave better protects against sparks and embers; the intumescent paint can be heat-activated to close off the vents.Detail decks correctly. Gap deck boards by 1/4 inch instead of 1/8 inch. Increase joist spacing to 24 inches on center. Face the top of each joist with self-adhering foil-faced tape. And use a deck board that qualifies for California Building Code Chapter 7A. For more information, see this fact sheet from the National Fire Protection Association.Invest in tempered glass in your windows. Tempered glass is three to four times more heat-resistance than standard annealed glass.Go with rigid mineral wool to match the fire-resistance of your wall claddings. Steve chose the rigid mineral wool over the Kooltherm, but he emphasized that a true clear space of at least 6 inches between finished grade and the bottom of the cladding is critical. Yes, 6 to 8 inches clear space is in every building code, but this is a pretty common deficiency in new homes.Use the information resources that IBHS has created. They are the most extensive and up-to-date resources and references for wildfire management available.last_img read more

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